The art: Martin Johnson Heade, Approaching Storm: Beach Near Newport, ~1861-62.
The news: "Brooklyn’s Guide to Hurricane Preparedness," by Choire Sicha for The Awl.
The source: Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Note: Before there was The Weather Channel, there was art. Throughout the day 3rd of May will post examples of artists thrilling to big, bad, threatening storms.

The art: Martin Johnson Heade, Approaching Storm: Beach Near Newport, ~1861-62.

The news: "Brooklyn’s Guide to Hurricane Preparedness," by Choire Sicha for The Awl.

The source: Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Note: Before there was The Weather Channel, there was art. Throughout the day 3rd of May will post examples of artists thrilling to big, bad, threatening storms.

The art: Stephen Vitiello, World Trade Center Recordings: Winds After Hurricane Floyd, 1999 and 2002.  (For six months in 1999, Vitiello occupied a studio on the 91st floor of the World Trade Center’s Tower One. This piece features both a chromogenic print and an 8 minute, 20 second DVD surround sound mix featuring the noises the WTC made under the stress of the winds after Hurricane Floyd. Sorry: I couldn’t find the audio.)
The news: "Irene, Floyd, Katrina, 9/11" by John Seabrook on The New Yorker’s website.
The source: Collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. 
Note: Before there was The Weather Channel, there was art. Throughout the day 3rd of May will post examples of artists thrilling to big, bad, threatening storms.

The art: Stephen Vitiello, World Trade Center Recordings: Winds After Hurricane Floyd, 1999 and 2002.  (For six months in 1999, Vitiello occupied a studio on the 91st floor of the World Trade Center’s Tower One. This piece features both a chromogenic print and an 8 minute, 20 second DVD surround sound mix featuring the noises the WTC made under the stress of the winds after Hurricane Floyd. Sorry: I couldn’t find the audio.)

The news: "Irene, Floyd, Katrina, 9/11" by John Seabrook on The New Yorker’s website.

The source: Collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. 

Note: Before there was The Weather Channel, there was art. Throughout the day 3rd of May will post examples of artists thrilling to big, bad, threatening storms.

The art: Roy Lichtenstein, Look Mickey, 1961.
The news: Comic-Con 2011 opens in San Diego, by Nicole Sperling and Yvonne Villareal in the Los Angeles Times.
The source: Collection of the National Gallery of Art.

The art: Roy Lichtenstein, Look Mickey, 1961.

The news: Comic-Con 2011 opens in San Diego, by Nicole Sperling and Yvonne Villareal in the Los Angeles Times.

The source: Collection of the National Gallery of Art.

Posted by modernartnotes
July 20, 2011 12:47pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y7Jn3vV
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Filed under: news, comics vintage art animals 
Today on Modern Art Notes: For weeks the future of stewardship of one of the most influential artworks of the 20th-century has been up in the air after the owner of Robert Smithson’s iconic Spiral Jetty apparently failed to renew its lease for the Utah state land on which the sculpture sits. [Image: Robert Smithson, Spiral of Sulphur, 1970. Collection of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.]
MAN has exclusively learned that the state of Utah is poised to award the Spiral Jetty-site lease as early as tomorrow. MAN reveals the expected lease-winner, the shotgun-marriage it’ll have to make in order to seal the deal, and why the arrangement could be good for Spiral Jetty and for the future of the Great Salt Lake.

Today on Modern Art Notes: For weeks the future of stewardship of one of the most influential artworks of the 20th-century has been up in the air after the owner of Robert Smithson’s iconic Spiral Jetty apparently failed to renew its lease for the Utah state land on which the sculpture sits. [Image: Robert Smithson, Spiral of Sulphur, 1970. Collection of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.]

MAN has exclusively learned that the state of Utah is poised to award the Spiral Jetty-site lease as early as tomorrow. MAN reveals the expected lease-winner, the shotgun-marriage it’ll have to make in order to seal the deal, and why the arrangement could be good for Spiral Jetty and for the future of the Great Salt Lake.

Posted by modernartnotes
July 20, 2011 9:09am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y7JSMkq
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Filed under: art, news, long reads 
Today on Modern Art Notes: This just in: The core of the Hunk & Moo Anderson collection of 20th-century art, one of the best in the world, is going to Stanford University, where it will be installed “near” the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts. Included in the gift is Jackson Pollock’s Lucifer (1947), above. For more on the gift and other news and notes, see Modern Art Notes.

Today on Modern Art Notes: This just in: The core of the Hunk & Moo Anderson collection of 20th-century art, one of the best in the world, is going to Stanford University, where it will be installed “near” the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts. Included in the gift is Jackson Pollock’s Lucifer (1947), above. For more on the gift and other news and notes, see Modern Art Notes.

Posted by modernartnotes
June 14, 2011 8:59am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y64dpoe
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Filed under: news, art, Pollock, Stanford 
The art: Francis Alys, Tornado (still from a 39-minute video), 2000-2010.
The news: "Joplin, Mo. Tornado is deadliest since 1953, death toll at 117," by Nicholas Riccardi and Michael Muskal in the Los Angeles Times.
The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. On view now in “Francis Alys: A Story of Deception.” At MoMA’s exhibition website, where you can see a video of the piece, the museum presents a narrative for how Alys intended the piece to be read. This week it reads mostly as ‘danger, flirted with.’

The art: Francis Alys, Tornado (still from a 39-minute video), 2000-2010.

The news: "Joplin, Mo. Tornado is deadliest since 1953, death toll at 117," by Nicholas Riccardi and Michael Muskal in the Los Angeles Times.

The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. On view now in “Francis Alys: A Story of Deception.” At MoMA’s exhibition website, where you can see a video of the piece, the museum presents a narrative for how Alys intended the piece to be read. This week it reads mostly as ‘danger, flirted with.’

Posted by modernartnotes
May 24, 2011 1:07pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5PxDVi
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Filed under: news, tornado, MoMA, art joplin Alys weather 
The art: Emily Jacir, Crossing Surda (a record of going to and from work), 2002. Four stills from a two-channel video installation, one 30 minute video and one 132 minute video. 
I can’t find any video to share, so here’s Jacir’s description of the piece: “Since March 2001, the Ramallah-Birzeit Road has been disrupted by a checkpoint manned by Israeli soldiers, APCs and sometimes tanks. This road was the last remaining open road connecting Ramallah with Birzeit University and approximately thirty Palestinian villages.
On December 9th, 2002, I decided to record my daily walk to work across the Surda checkpoint to Birzeit University. When the Israeli Occupation Army saw me filming my feet with my video camera, they stopped me and asked for my I.D. I gave them my American passport, and they threw it in the mud. They told me that this was ‘Israel’ and that it was a military zone and that no filming was allowed. They detained me at gunpoint in the winter rain next to their tank. After three hours, they confiscated my videotape and then released me. I watched the soldier slip my videotape into the pocket of his army pants. That night when I returned home, I cut a hole in my bag and put my video camera in the bag. I recorded my daily walk across Surda checkpoint, to and from work, for eight days.
All people including the disabled, elderly, and children must walk distances as far as two kilometers depending on the decisions of the Israeli army at any given time. When Israeli soldiers decide that there should be no movement on the road, they shoot live ammunition, tear gas, and sound bombs to disperse people from the checkpoint.”
The news: The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg has published a dozen or so blog posts in response to President Obama’s speech on the Middle East and North Africa. Highly recommended.
The source: Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London, Brooklyn Museum.

The art: Emily Jacir, Crossing Surda (a record of going to and from work), 2002. Four stills from a two-channel video installation, one 30 minute video and one 132 minute video. 

I can’t find any video to share, so here’s Jacir’s description of the piece: “Since March 2001, the Ramallah-Birzeit Road has been disrupted by a checkpoint manned by Israeli soldiers, APCs and sometimes tanks. This road was the last remaining open road connecting Ramallah with Birzeit University and approximately thirty Palestinian villages.

On December 9th, 2002, I decided to record my daily walk to work across the Surda checkpoint to Birzeit University. When the Israeli Occupation Army saw me filming my feet with my video camera, they stopped me and asked for my I.D. I gave them my American passport, and they threw it in the mud. They told me that this was ‘Israel’ and that it was a military zone and that no filming was allowed. They detained me at gunpoint in the winter rain next to their tank. After three hours, they confiscated my videotape and then released me. I watched the soldier slip my videotape into the pocket of his army pants. That night when I returned home, I cut a hole in my bag and put my video camera in the bag. I recorded my daily walk across Surda checkpoint, to and from work, for eight days.

All people including the disabled, elderly, and children must walk distances as far as two kilometers depending on the decisions of the Israeli army at any given time. When Israeli soldiers decide that there should be no movement on the road, they shoot live ammunition, tear gas, and sound bombs to disperse people from the checkpoint.”

The news: The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg has published a dozen or so blog posts in response to President Obama’s speech on the Middle East and North Africa. Highly recommended.

The source: Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London, Brooklyn Museum.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 20, 2011 10:42am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5HpoPu
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Today on Modern Art Notes: Last week, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts announced that the VMFA will be the first museum to exhibit its collection in the Palace Museum in Beijing. (The dates for that exhibition are to be determined.) The Palace Museum, which is part of the Forbidden City complex, will reciprocate by sending an exhibition of its collection to Richmond in the summer of 2014.
The VMFA announced the deal with the Chinese as China’s detention of Ai Weiwei was in its second month. The arrangement prompts the question: Is it appropriate for an American art museum to be engaged in this kind of transaction with the Chinese when the Chinese have demonstrated their hostility to — and fear of — their country’s most internationally prominent artist?
Earlier this week I talked with VMFA director Alex Nyerges about his museum’s arrangement with the Chinese. Click here to read our Q&A.

Today on Modern Art Notes: Last week, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts announced that the VMFA will be the first museum to exhibit its collection in the Palace Museum in Beijing. (The dates for that exhibition are to be determined.) The Palace Museum, which is part of the Forbidden City complex, will reciprocate by sending an exhibition of its collection to Richmond in the summer of 2014.

The VMFA announced the deal with the Chinese as China’s detention of Ai Weiwei was in its second month. The arrangement prompts the question: Is it appropriate for an American art museum to be engaged in this kind of transaction with the Chinese when the Chinese have demonstrated their hostility to — and fear of — their country’s most internationally prominent artist?

Earlier this week I talked with VMFA director Alex Nyerges about his museum’s arrangement with the Chinese. Click here to read our Q&A.