joygarnett:

 Joy Garnett: ‘Predator 1’ Wikileaks series* (2012) oil on canvas. 16 x 16 inches

Proteus Gowanus 543 Union Street (at Nevins) Brooklyn, NY 11215 [MAP/DIRECTIONS]
http://proteusgowanus.org
718.243.1572

Gallery Hours Thursday & Friday, 3–6 pm Saturday & Sunday, 12–6 pm
Secret Wars

Opening Reception: Saturday, January 12, 7pm
Secret Wars, the second exhibition in Proteus Gowanus’ yearlong exploration of Battle, explores the cryptic ways of warfare waged behind the cloak of invisibility. From neurophysical conflict deep inside the human amygdala, to the broadcast signals used by spies and intelligence agencies, to the everyday observation of ordinary citizens by omniscient bureaucracies, Secret Wars reveals covert communications hiding in plain sight. Curated by Proteus Gowanus creative director Tammy Pittman and anthropologist Thomas Ross Miller, the exhibition brings artists from New York, Amsterdam and Berlin to trace the gaps, silences, and blackouts that conceal vital and deadly knowledge.
Who controls secret information, and who has the power to understand it? How do we protect ourselves from unseen enemies? Who wins and who loses when the battle is unending and unknowable? Through art, artifacts, books, sound and surveillance, these installations render what is absent present and what is invisible visible. Inside a special room, mysterious and hypnotic short-wave radio messages in unbreakable codes are beamed to hidden spies. Lost treasures, occult symbols and predator drones appear and disappear, closely guarded enigmas shrouded in obscure and half-forgotten codes.
Artists and works include: Front404 – PanoptICONS Joy Garnett – Predator series David Goren – “Atencion! Seis Siete Tres Siete Cero”: The Mystery of the Shortwave Numbers Stations Nene Humphrey – Circling the Center Anna Livia Löwendahl-Atomic – NØbjects and Otophgraphs from The Mu{e}sum Renée Ridgway – Revelation of the Concealed Smudge Studio – TRANSCOM Bryan M. Wilson – Canticle for Sebeok (Atomic Priesthood) with J. Morgan Puett & Katie Marie Coble  - Vestments for Ten Millennium (Atomic Priest Suit)
*Joy Garnett’s paintings have utilized representations of the ‘techno-military sublime’ since the late 1990s. These four paintings are part of her recent ‘Predator’ or ‘Wikileaks’ project, (2011 - ongoing), comprised of multiple series of monochromatic target or grid-like compositions that use night vision and heat-seeking imagery as source material. Based on screen-grabs of various declassified or leaked US military videos of secret operations, the Predator series takes technical images of machine vision and translates them into ambiguous objects.

joygarnett:

Joy Garnett: ‘Predator 1’ Wikileaks series* (2012) oil on canvas. 16 x 16 inches


Proteus Gowanus
543 Union Street (at Nevins)
Brooklyn, NY 11215 [MAP/DIRECTIONS]

http://proteusgowanus.org

718.243.1572

Gallery Hours
Thursday & Friday, 3–6 pm
Saturday & Sunday, 12–6 pm

Secret Wars

Opening Reception: Saturday, January 12, 7pm

Secret Wars, the second exhibition in Proteus Gowanus’ yearlong exploration of Battle, explores the cryptic ways of warfare waged behind the cloak of invisibility. From neurophysical conflict deep inside the human amygdala, to the broadcast signals used by spies and intelligence agencies, to the everyday observation of ordinary citizens by omniscient bureaucracies, Secret Wars reveals covert communications hiding in plain sight. Curated by Proteus Gowanus creative director Tammy Pittman and anthropologist Thomas Ross Miller, the exhibition brings artists from New York, Amsterdam and Berlin to trace the gaps, silences, and blackouts that conceal vital and deadly knowledge.

Who controls secret information, and who has the power to understand it? How do we protect ourselves from unseen enemies? Who wins and who loses when the battle is unending and unknowable? Through art, artifacts, books, sound and surveillance, these installations render what is absent present and what is invisible visible. Inside a special room, mysterious and hypnotic short-wave radio messages in unbreakable codes are beamed to hidden spies. Lost treasures, occult symbols and predator drones appear and disappear, closely guarded enigmas shrouded in obscure and half-forgotten codes.

Artists and works include:

Front404 – PanoptICONS
Joy Garnett – Predator series
David Goren – “Atencion! Seis Siete Tres Siete Cero”: The Mystery of the Shortwave Numbers Stations
Nene Humphrey – Circling the Center
Anna Livia Löwendahl-Atomic – NØbjects and Otophgraphs from The Mu{e}sum
Renée Ridgway – Revelation of the Concealed
Smudge Studio – TRANSCOM
Bryan M. Wilson – Canticle for Sebeok (Atomic Priesthood) with
J. Morgan Puett & Katie Marie Coble  - Vestments for Ten Millennium (Atomic Priest Suit)


*Joy Garnett’s paintings have utilized representations of the ‘techno-military sublime’ since the late 1990s. These four paintings are part of her recent ‘Predator’ or ‘Wikileaks’ project, (2011 - ongoing), comprised of multiple series of monochromatic target or grid-like compositions that use night vision and heat-seeking imagery as source material. Based on screen-grabs of various declassified or leaked US military videos of secret operations, the Predator series takes technical images of machine vision and translates them into ambiguous objects.

Posted by modernartnotes
January 6, 2013 6:11pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yb8pO8y
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features the new Museum of Fine Arts Houston exhibition “War Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath.” Anne Wilkes Tucker, the show’s co-curator (along with MFAH’s Will Michaels and Natalie Zelt) joins me to discuss the exhibition and the related 600-page book from the MFAH and the Yale University Press.

This is a detail from a picture that re-enacts the site at which Saddam Hussein emerged from his ‘spider hole’ during the Iraq War. Tucker notes that many war sites become tourist sites — including this one. (See the full version here.)

The show, which opens this weekend and runs through February 3, includes almost 500 objects, images by more than 280 photographers on six continents, all of it covering 165 years of war. The exhibition and catalogue are presented thematically, with sections on war-related topics such as recruitment, training, daily routine, patrol, the wait, the fight itself, leisure time and more.

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. See more images discussed on this week’s show. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!

Image: Yuri Kozyrev, A journalist climbs out of the hole where toppled dictator Saddam Hussein was captured in Ad Dawr. Iraq’s defeated leader raised his arms out of his ‘rat hole’ and said he was Saddam Hussein and that he wanted to negotiate, Iraq, December 15, 2003.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features the new Museum of Fine Arts Houston exhibition “War Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath.” Anne Wilkes Tucker, the show’s co-curator (along with MFAH’s Will Michaels and Natalie Zelt) joins me to discuss the exhibition and the related 600-page book from the MFAH and the Yale University Press.

The show, which opens this weekend and runs through February 3, includes almost 500 objects, images by more than 280 photographers on six continents, all of it covering 165 years of war. The exhibition and catalogue are presented thematically, with sections on war-related topics such as recruitment, training, daily routine, patrol, the wait, the fight itself, leisure time and more.

On the second segment I talk with Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space. Next week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be on view permanently at the museum. Photographs of the installations were unavailable as of show-time. When they become available I’ll add them here and feature them via social media, especially on our new Facebook page.

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!

Image: Luis Sinco, Marlboro Marine (detail), November 8, 2004. Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Posted by modernartnotes
November 8, 2012 4:19pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yWtTQYx
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Destroy this memory; archive the art digitally

richardmccoy:

Modern Art Notes has a smart take on the damage caused to artworks from Hurricane Sandy.  While cultural institutions do a good job with documentation, this underscores the need for all of us to do better, and to work together to preserve artworks today.

Posted by modernartnotes
November 7, 2012 10:10am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yWoIwZZ
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Filed under: art news Sandy hurricane sandy 
thegetty:

One of the earliest depictions of voting in art: Greek chieftains use pebbles as ballots to decide who should win the magical armor of Achilles. This reflects how the ancient Greeks actually voted.
Detail from the reverse side of Wine Cup with the Suicide of Ajax, about 490 B.C., attributed to the Brygos Painter. The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

One of the earliest depictions of voting in art: Greek chieftains use pebbles as ballots to decide who should win the magical armor of Achilles. This reflects how the ancient Greeks actually voted.

Detail from the reverse side of Wine Cup with the Suicide of Ajax, about 490 B.C., attributed to the Brygos Painter. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Posted by modernartnotes
November 6, 2012 12:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yWkBcyi
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postcardsfromamerica:

“Citizen 941 _0042” 
Photo by Ashley Thompson
The images from the “Citizen 941” project are of disenfranchised voters from Sarasota, FL and the surrounding area.  The photographer, Ashley Thompson, is also a disenfranchised voter.    
In Florida, individuals convicted of a felony are stripped of their civil and voting rights, even after completion of their sentences. Loss of civil rights takes away not only the right to vote, but also the right to hold public office, serve on a jury, and qualify for certain types of state licenses necessary for many jobs, such as those in the construction and medical fields.

postcardsfromamerica:

“Citizen 941 _0042” 

Photo by Ashley Thompson

The images from the “Citizen 941” project are of disenfranchised voters from Sarasota, FL and the surrounding area.  The photographer, Ashley Thompson, is also a disenfranchised voter.    

In Florida, individuals convicted of a felony are stripped of their civil and voting rights, even after completion of their sentences. Loss of civil rights takes away not only the right to vote, but also the right to hold public office, serve on a jury, and qualify for certain types of state licenses necessary for many jobs, such as those in the construction and medical fields.

Posted by modernartnotes
November 5, 2012 7:03pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yWhSYeS
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Filed under: art portrait politics news 

manpodcast:

This picture shows the gated community in which Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney gave his infamous “47% speech.”

It’s a detail from a picture was taken by Magnum Photos member Zoe Strauss, who is traveling through Florida this month with fellow Magnum-ites Alec Soth and Alessandra Sanguinetti. They’re posting some of their work here on Tumblr, at Postcards From America. If you’re not following it, you should! (Here’s another of Strauss’s photos.)

On the occasion of Strauss’s mid-career survey at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, she was the lead guest on Episode No. 10 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast. Strauss’s appearance will make you laugh and cry — and you’ll understand why she and her camera see the things she’s seeing in Florida.

Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe via iTunes, RSS. See more images of the work Strauss and I discussed on the program.

Image: Zoe Strauss, Snakebird perched on duck decoy in the gated community where Mitt Romney gave his “47%” speech, Boca Raton, FL, 2012. 

"You have to scratch your head when the president spends the last week talking about saving Big Bird. I actually think we need to have a president who talks about saving the American people and saving good jobs."

Mitt Romney, today.

Romney has promised to kill the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (which funds PBS and NPR), the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. That would likely put thousands of Americans — maybe tens of thousands — out of work. Why is Mitt Romney running on a platform of killing jobs?

For more on Romney’s record on cultural-sector jobs while governor of Massachusetts, see Modern Art Notes. 

Posted by modernartnotes
October 9, 2012 7:16pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yU_UKf1
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Filed under: art news politics jobs economy 

manpodcast:

The picture on the right shows a racist ‘symbolic political display’ in the Bay Area exurb of Morgan Hill, Calif. It was apparently erected by local resident Blake la Beck, reports KTVU-TV. The display features two watermelons, a noose and a ‘Romney for President’ sign. A nearby object set up to recall a teleprompter included a text panel that said, ‘Go back to Kenya.’ 

As I’ve noted before during this election season, artist Carrie Mae Weems has anticipated this kind of racism in her work for decades. The image at right is Weems’s Black Man Holding Watermelon from the series “Ain’t Jokin’” (1987-88). (Larger image here.) It’s among the work Weems and I discussed when she was on last week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. A major retrospective of Weems’s work is now on view at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville.

Download the program to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. See more images of artworks discussed on the program.

Posted by modernartnotes
October 9, 2012 1:01pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yUz6mkY
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Today is Columbus Day, but for how much longer? As you may know, there’s a nascent mini-movement afoot to re-name the holiday “Explorer’s Day” or “Exploration Day.” As an art guy, I fully support this idea, if only because there’s a lot more art about exploration in America than there is of, uh, Cristóbal Colón. 
From Modern Art Notes, here’s one story — or is it two? — of art and exploration in the United States. I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed typing it up.
Image: Edward Kern, Sunday Oct 29 1848 on the before crossing Smoky Hill For[k]. Smoky Hills in the Distance, 1848. Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

Today is Columbus Day, but for how much longer? As you may know, there’s a nascent mini-movement afoot to re-name the holiday “Explorer’s Day” or “Exploration Day.” As an art guy, I fully support this idea, if only because there’s a lot more art about exploration in America than there is of, uh, Cristóbal Colón. 

From Modern Art Notes, here’s one story — or is it two? — of art and exploration in the United States. I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed typing it up.

Image: Edward Kern, Sunday Oct 29 1848 on the before crossing Smoky Hill For[k]. Smoky Hills in the Distance, 1848. Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

Posted by modernartnotes
October 8, 2012 10:18am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yUuSS8A
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Filed under: art news Columbus Day landscape 

cjchivers:

A Kalashnikov For $89,000, and Sculptures in Search of Nose Jobs.

We’ve often said that many commentators — be they gun buffs, journalists or aid organizations — make a mess of describing Kalashnikov prices. You’ve heard the apocryphal and endlessly repeated stories: an AK for a chicken, an AK for $15, an AK for a sack of grain.

We’ve never seen prices like those, and if they have existed here or there then they were extraordinary and short-lived, and should not be the basis for talking about arms transfers and prices in a serious way. Ignore the echo otherwise. The common price range for a Kalashnikov in a conflict zone runs from several hundred to a few thousand dollars, depending on many factors we will not trouble you with here or now. Today we point in the opposite direction — a price at the other end of the scale.

Now comes perhaps the most expensive AK yet, and documented in London as a public fact: 55,000 British pounds for a rifle dressed in splashed paint. 

That’s $89k, USD. And several other AKs sold at a charity auction for prices nearly that high.  Talk about knocking around your assumptions.

From Bloomberg:

Damien Hirst’s spin painting on an assault rifle fetched the top price in an auction that raised $675,000 for a peace charity.

Hirst’s “Spin AK-47 for Peace One Day” sold for 55,000 pounds ($89,000) last night in London. It had been estimated at 25,000 pounds to 35,000 pounds in a Phillips de Pury & Co. auction of works donated by contemporary artists to benefit Peace One Day’s Global Truce 2013 campaign.

The project, titled “AKA Peace,” was conceived by photographer Bran Symondson, a former soldier who served in Afghanistan. It followed an exhibition at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts showing 24 works by artists such as Antony Gormley, Marc Quinn and Sam Taylor-Wood inspired by the AK-47. The ICA show was curated by Jake Chapman, who, together with his brother Dinos, was among the contributing artists.

“I am not readily associated with a sense of philanthropic optimism,” Chapman said in a statement before the sale. “But after a meeting with (charity organizer) Jeremy Gilley, my pessimism was suspended in favor of supporting this audacious attempt to intervene against human injustice.”

Gormley’s “Silence”, featuring a section of steel with one of the Russia-designed AK-47s, sold for 50,000 pounds.

The Chapman Brothers’ fiber-glass sculptures of assault rifle-toting girls, “Yin” and “Yang,” went for 35,000 pounds and 45,000 pounds.

All 24 of the lots sold, raising a formal total of 417,100 pounds for Global Truce 2013. Phillips didn’t charge fees.

While the auction must be put down as a success (take a bow, Mr. Symondson), it’s hard  to know what make of the noses on Yin and Yang, beyond the obvious. Yin and Yang sold for a combined $129,000. We won’t be including them in our files of AK price data, but if you want that kind of thing in your office or your living room, so be it. Taste, like speed, is hard to coach.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHS

From Peace One Day. For more about Peace One Day, check out their FB page.

Posted by modernartnotes
October 5, 2012 10:24am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yUhHrop
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Filed under: art news politics 
The facts on Mitt Romney and jobs in the arts

In last night’s debate, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney talked a lot about job creation and how he’s good at it. Well, not when it comes to the arts and arts-related industries. On Modern Art Notes, I present the facts about Romney and jobs in the arts. You might be surprised at how many arts jobs there are in Massachusetts — and how bad Gov. Romney was when it came to helping create jobs in the sector.

Posted by modernartnotes
October 4, 2012 10:13am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yUdKdf5
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On Modern Art Notes: Considering the GOP’s latest night of racist stereotyping (with some help from Carrie Mae Weems).
Image: Carrie Mae Weems, Black Man Holding Watermelon from “Ain’t Jokin’”, 1987-88.

On Modern Art Notes: Considering the GOP’s latest night of racist stereotyping (with some help from Carrie Mae Weems).

Image: Carrie Mae Weems, Black Man Holding Watermelon from “Ain’t Jokin’”, 1987-88.

Child labor still exists in many countries around the world. In India, the government has proposed new legislation that it says will address the country’s child labor problem, Amy Kazmin reported in The Washington Post last week.
thegetty:

“Cotton-Mill Worker, North Carolina,” 1908, Lewis W. Hine, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Child labor still exists in many countries around the world. In India, the government has proposed new legislation that it says will address the country’s child labor problem, Amy Kazmin reported in The Washington Post last week.

thegetty:

“Cotton-Mill Worker, North Carolina,” 1908, Lewis W. Hine, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Posted by modernartnotes
September 4, 2012 11:03am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6ySm3HRO
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manpodcast:

As ever.

Episode No. 36 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast featured Barbara Kruger, an artist who dislikes the term ‘feminist artist,’ but whose art has given image to feminist thought for several decades. Kruger’s most recent commission, Belief + Doubt, is now on view at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

One of the topics Kruger and I discussed was the genesis and development of Kruger’s interest in works that deal with sociopolitical themes — and male-dominated power structures in particular. Given the outrageous, rape-excusing statements and positions made by GOP U.S. Senate candidate Rep. Todd Akin and presumptive GOP vice-presidential nominee Rep. Paul Ryan, today seemed like a good day to share the Kruger show.

Kruger was the subject of an Ann Goldstein-curated 1999 retrospective at MOCA, an exhibition that traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art. Her installation at — and actually on — the Italian Pavilion at the 2005 Venice Biennale helped her win the Biennale’s lifetime achievement award.

To download the Kruger program directly, click here. To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can see images of artworks discussed on the show here.

Image: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your body is a battleground), 1989. Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.

Posted by modernartnotes
August 20, 2012 1:32pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yRoPq4R
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