The art: Lucinda Devlin, Electric Chair, Indiana State Prison, Michigan City, Indiana, from “The Omega Suites,” 1991.
The news: "Death Penalty Repeal Goes To Connecticut’s Governor," by Peter Applebome for The New York Times.
The source: Collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

The art: Lucinda Devlin, Electric Chair, Indiana State Prison, Michigan City, Indiana, from “The Omega Suites,” 1991.

The news: "Death Penalty Repeal Goes To Connecticut’s Governor," by Peter Applebome for The New York Times.

The source: Collection of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Posted by modernartnotes
April 12, 2012 8:32am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yJXO7jF
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Filed under: art news Indiana death penalty 
The art: Bruce Conner, THE CHILD, 1959-60.
The news: "Texas Toast: Rick Perry’s Death Penalty Calendar," by Andrew Cohen on TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Historical note: “Conner was outraged at the death sentence given to Caryl Chessman, who had been arrested in Los Angeles for rape and robbery, but who claimed that the confession he signed was the product of police brutality. (Despite worldwide protest, Chessman was eventually executed in 1960.) To protest this decision, Conner collected scavenged materials to create the assemblage THE CHILD (1959), which presents a shrunken, grotesquely gnarled, and mutilated man-child modeled in wax. The figure is wrapped in nylon hosiery and tied to a high chair; a horrendous cry seems to come from the hole that has taken the place of a mouth. Here Conner revealed the death penalty as a relic of barbarism that mocks society’s claim to civilized status. To encounter THE CHILD in its original shape elicited a great frisson. The Museum of Modern Art, realizing its import, acquired it soon after it was made, but found this mordant sculpture so disturbing that it has almost never been on view. Unfortunately, it is now in a state of great disrepair. ” — excerpted from "Art of engagement: visual politics in California and beyond," by Peter Selz and Susan Landauer. 

The art: Bruce Conner, THE CHILD, 1959-60.

The news: "Texas Toast: Rick Perry’s Death Penalty Calendar," by Andrew Cohen on TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Historical note: “Conner was outraged at the death sentence given to Caryl Chessman, who had been arrested in Los Angeles for rape and robbery, but who claimed that the confession he signed was the product of police brutality. (Despite worldwide protest, Chessman was eventually executed in 1960.) To protest this decision, Conner collected scavenged materials to create the assemblage THE CHILD (1959), which presents a shrunken, grotesquely gnarled, and mutilated man-child modeled in wax. The figure is wrapped in nylon hosiery and tied to a high chair; a horrendous cry seems to come from the hole that has taken the place of a mouth. Here Conner revealed the death penalty as a relic of barbarism that mocks society’s claim to civilized status. To encounter THE CHILD in its original shape elicited a great frisson. The Museum of Modern Art, realizing its import, acquired it soon after it was made, but found this mordant sculpture so disturbing that it has almost never been on view. Unfortunately, it is now in a state of great disrepair. ” — excerpted from "Art of engagement: visual politics in California and beyond," by Peter Selz and Susan Landauer. 

Posted by modernartnotes
September 7, 2011 10:40am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y9FAtAV
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The art: Wayne Thiebaud, Electric Chair, 1957. With this painting, and three or four others similar to it, Thiebaud expressed his opposition to the death penalty.
The news: "Former California prisons leader joins fight against the death penalty," by Carol J. Williams in the Los Angeles Times.
The source: Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The art: Wayne Thiebaud, Electric Chair, 1957. With this painting, and three or four others similar to it, Thiebaud expressed his opposition to the death penalty.

The news: "Former California prisons leader joins fight against the death penalty," by Carol J. Williams in the Los Angeles Times.

The source: Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 12, 2011 12:36pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y53G_lF
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