Today on Modern Art Notes: The third and final part of my profile of Clyfford Still, one of America’s greatest and least understood painters. (The Clyfford Still Museum opens next month in Denver.)
In part three I report on Still’s incredibly acerbic nature — and try to explain it. I also discuss how he seems to have been motivated by the Cold War and influenced by the American landscape. Click here to read — and to see more super Stills!
[Image: Clyfford Still, 1949-G, 1949. Collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.]

Today on Modern Art Notes: The third and final part of my profile of Clyfford Still, one of America’s greatest and least understood painters. (The Clyfford Still Museum opens next month in Denver.)

In part three I report on Still’s incredibly acerbic nature — and try to explain it. I also discuss how he seems to have been motivated by the Cold War and influenced by the American landscape. Click here to read — and to see more super Stills!

[Image: Clyfford Still, 1949-G, 1949. Collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa.]

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October 13, 2011 1:16pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yAdSjey
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Filed under: art, long reads 
The art: Aelbert Cuyp, The Maas at Dordrecht in a Storm, 1645-50.
The news: Hurricane Irene is closing in on the Eastern seaboard. For a 21st-century view of a storm, see "Hurricane Irene’s Terrifying Scale as Seen From Space," on TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of The National Gallery, London.
Note: Before there was The Weather Channel, there was art. Throughout the day 3rd of May will post examples of artists thrilling to big, bad, threatening storms.

The art: Aelbert Cuyp, The Maas at Dordrecht in a Storm, 1645-50.

The news: Hurricane Irene is closing in on the Eastern seaboard. For a 21st-century view of a storm, see "Hurricane Irene’s Terrifying Scale as Seen From Space," on TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of The National Gallery, London.

Note: Before there was The Weather Channel, there was art. Throughout the day 3rd of May will post examples of artists thrilling to big, bad, threatening storms.

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August 26, 2011 9:13am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y8n5iyX
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The art: Otto Dix, Shock Troops Advance Under Gas from The War, 1924.
The news: "Assad’s Chemical Romance: As Syria descends into chaos, its stockpiles of chemical weaponry could turn into a proliferation nightmare," by Leonard Spector for Foreign Policy magazine. 
The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Note: The 20th-century’s two most horrific classes of weapons, chemical and atomic/nuclear, motivated some of the century’s most intense art. During and after World War I, many artists made urgent, Yo lo vi! work about the horrors of poison gas. The 50-print portfolio from which this work comes, Dix’s The War, is one of the great and underrated accomplishments of 20th-century art.

The art: Otto Dix, Shock Troops Advance Under Gas from The War, 1924.

The news: "Assad’s Chemical Romance: As Syria descends into chaos, its stockpiles of chemical weaponry could turn into a proliferation nightmare," by Leonard Spector for Foreign Policy magazine. 

The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Note: The 20th-century’s two most horrific classes of weapons, chemical and atomic/nuclear, motivated some of the century’s most intense art. During and after World War I, many artists made urgent, Yo lo vi! work about the horrors of poison gas. The 50-print portfolio from which this work comes, Dix’s The War, is one of the great and underrated accomplishments of 20th-century art.

Today on Modern Art Notes: This new Nancy Rubins at Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Art Gallery isn’t just an awesome sculpture, it could help connect the perpetually underrated art museum to its community and help the museum recover from years of self-inflicted wounds.

Today on Modern Art Notes: This new Nancy Rubins at Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Art Gallery isn’t just an awesome sculpture, it could help connect the perpetually underrated art museum to its community and help the museum recover from years of self-inflicted wounds.

Today on Modern Art Notes: The most fascinating public art project currently under consideration in the United States is Fred Wilson’s proposed E Pluribus Unum in Indianapolis. A rendering of the artwork is above.
The project has been mired in a series of stops-and-starts for several years. Now one group opposed to the project is launching an “anti-slave rally” at the Indiana state capital. Read the amazing tale of E Pluribus Unum and the long, strange path to this weekend’s “anti-slave rally” on Modern Art Notes. 

Today on Modern Art Notes: The most fascinating public art project currently under consideration in the United States is Fred Wilson’s proposed E Pluribus Unum in Indianapolis. A rendering of the artwork is above.

The project has been mired in a series of stops-and-starts for several years. Now one group opposed to the project is launching an “anti-slave rally” at the Indiana state capital. Read the amazing tale of E Pluribus Unum and the long, strange path to this weekend’s “anti-slave rally” on Modern Art Notes. 

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July 28, 2011 10:12am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y7d2rnQ
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Filed under: art, long reads, news politics 
Today on Modern Art Notes: For weeks the future of stewardship of one of the most influential artworks of the 20th-century has been up in the air after the owner of Robert Smithson’s iconic Spiral Jetty apparently failed to renew its lease for the Utah state land on which the sculpture sits. [Image: Robert Smithson, Spiral of Sulphur, 1970. Collection of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.]
MAN has exclusively learned that the state of Utah is poised to award the Spiral Jetty-site lease as early as tomorrow. MAN reveals the expected lease-winner, the shotgun-marriage it’ll have to make in order to seal the deal, and why the arrangement could be good for Spiral Jetty and for the future of the Great Salt Lake.

Today on Modern Art Notes: For weeks the future of stewardship of one of the most influential artworks of the 20th-century has been up in the air after the owner of Robert Smithson’s iconic Spiral Jetty apparently failed to renew its lease for the Utah state land on which the sculpture sits. [Image: Robert Smithson, Spiral of Sulphur, 1970. Collection of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts.]

MAN has exclusively learned that the state of Utah is poised to award the Spiral Jetty-site lease as early as tomorrow. MAN reveals the expected lease-winner, the shotgun-marriage it’ll have to make in order to seal the deal, and why the arrangement could be good for Spiral Jetty and for the future of the Great Salt Lake.

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July 20, 2011 9:09am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y7JSMkq
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The art: Francis Bacon, Head VI, 1949. 
The news: Rupert Murdoch and his gang of News Corporation associates face Parliament. Live updates from: The Atlantic, The Guardian. Moment of the day (so far) was when Rupert Murdoch was asked if he accepts that he is ultimately responsible for the whole fiasco. His answer: “No.”
The source: Collection of Arts Council England.

The art: Francis Bacon, Head VI, 1949. 

The news: Rupert Murdoch and his gang of News Corporation associates face Parliament. Live updates from: The Atlantic, The Guardian. Moment of the day (so far) was when Rupert Murdoch was asked if he accepts that he is ultimately responsible for the whole fiasco. His answer: “No.”

The source: Collection of Arts Council England.

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July 19, 2011 10:37am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y7H5vOk
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Filed under: art, portrait news 
The art: Jenny Saville, Strategy, 1994.
The news: "America just keeps getting fatter," by Melissa Healy in the Los Angeles Times.
The source: Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.

The art: Jenny Saville, Strategy, 1994.

The news: "America just keeps getting fatter," by Melissa Healy in the Los Angeles Times.

The source: Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.

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July 8, 2011 9:22am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y6t_XWa
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Filed under: art, portrait, 
The art: Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973.
The news: "Chairman Mao’s Technicolor Dream World: A short history of China’s propaganda art," by Edmund Downie at Foreign Policy magazine.
The source: Collection of The Art Institute of Chicago. 

The art: Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973.

The news: "Chairman Mao’s Technicolor Dream World: A short history of China’s propaganda art," by Edmund Downie at Foreign Policy magazine.

The source: Collection of The Art Institute of Chicago. 

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July 6, 2011 1:08pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y6pXscK
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Filed under: art, portrait China 
Today on Modern Art Notes: This just in: The core of the Hunk & Moo Anderson collection of 20th-century art, one of the best in the world, is going to Stanford University, where it will be installed “near” the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts. Included in the gift is Jackson Pollock’s Lucifer (1947), above. For more on the gift and other news and notes, see Modern Art Notes.

Today on Modern Art Notes: This just in: The core of the Hunk & Moo Anderson collection of 20th-century art, one of the best in the world, is going to Stanford University, where it will be installed “near” the Cantor Center for the Visual Arts. Included in the gift is Jackson Pollock’s Lucifer (1947), above. For more on the gift and other news and notes, see Modern Art Notes.

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June 14, 2011 8:59am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y64dpoe
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Filed under: news, art, Pollock, Stanford 
The art: Bright Ugochukwu Eke, Acid Rain, 2009. (The piece’s materials include water, plastic bags and carbon. See here for more.)
The news: "Storms Brewing" by Elizabeth Kolbert in The New Yorker. "On Climate Change, GOP Candidates Race to the Fringe," by Conor Friedersdorf in The Atlantic.
The source: Rethinkclimate.org, the website for an exhibition organized in 2009 by the National Gallery of Denmark, Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center and the Alexandra Institute.

The art: Bright Ugochukwu Eke, Acid Rain, 2009. (The piece’s materials include water, plastic bags and carbon. See here for more.)

The news: "Storms Brewing" by Elizabeth Kolbert in The New Yorker. "On Climate Change, GOP Candidates Race to the Fringe," by Conor Friedersdorf in The Atlantic.

The source: Rethinkclimate.org, the website for an exhibition organized in 2009 by the National Gallery of Denmark, Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center and the Alexandra Institute.

Posted by modernartnotes
June 10, 2011 9:16am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5yUJa3
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The art: Carleton Watkins, View from Caleb Carriger Orange Orchard, One Mile South of El Verano, Looking [East] Across Sonoma Valley, ca. 1887. According to the Online Archive of California, the Sonoma Valley Improvement Country hired Watkins to photograph the countryside and estates of the Sonoma Valley as a promotional tool. Best known for his dramatic mountain landscapes, Watkins’ pictures often showed the ways in which the federal government enabled or promoted new agricultural products in California. 
The news: "How Uncle Sam Helped Define America’s Diet," by Renee Montagne on NPR’s “Morning Edition.”
The source: Collection of The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere.

The art: Carleton Watkins, View from Caleb Carriger Orange Orchard, One Mile South of El Verano, Looking [East] Across Sonoma Valley, ca. 1887. According to the Online Archive of California, the Sonoma Valley Improvement Country hired Watkins to photograph the countryside and estates of the Sonoma Valley as a promotional tool. Best known for his dramatic mountain landscapes, Watkins’ pictures often showed the ways in which the federal government enabled or promoted new agricultural products in California. 

The news: "How Uncle Sam Helped Define America’s Diet," by Renee Montagne on NPR’s “Morning Edition.”

The source: Collection of The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere.

The art: Fred Tomaselli, Glassy, 2006.
The news: "The Epidemic of Mental Illness: Why?" by Marcia Angell in The New York Review of Books. 
The source: James Cohan Gallery.

The art: Fred Tomaselli, Glassy, 2006.

The news: "The Epidemic of Mental Illness: Why?" by Marcia Angell in The New York Review of Books. 

The source: James Cohan Gallery.

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June 6, 2011 2:42pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5qreVG
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Today on Modern Art Notes: This sculpture on view now at the Whitney Museum of American Art — Robert Grosvenor’s Tenerife (1966) — is awesomely trippy. I think I know why. I am wrong, repeatedly.

Today on Modern Art Notes: This sculpture on view now at the Whitney Museum of American Art — Robert Grosvenor’s Tenerife (1966) — is awesomely trippy. I think I know why. I am wrong, repeatedly.

Today on Modern Art Notes: Last week, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts announced that the VMFA will be the first museum to exhibit its collection in the Palace Museum in Beijing. (The dates for that exhibition are to be determined.) The Palace Museum, which is part of the Forbidden City complex, will reciprocate by sending an exhibition of its collection to Richmond in the summer of 2014.
The VMFA announced the deal with the Chinese as China’s detention of Ai Weiwei was in its second month. The arrangement prompts the question: Is it appropriate for an American art museum to be engaged in this kind of transaction with the Chinese when the Chinese have demonstrated their hostility to — and fear of — their country’s most internationally prominent artist?
Earlier this week I talked with VMFA director Alex Nyerges about his museum’s arrangement with the Chinese. Click here to read our Q&A.

Today on Modern Art Notes: Last week, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts announced that the VMFA will be the first museum to exhibit its collection in the Palace Museum in Beijing. (The dates for that exhibition are to be determined.) The Palace Museum, which is part of the Forbidden City complex, will reciprocate by sending an exhibition of its collection to Richmond in the summer of 2014.

The VMFA announced the deal with the Chinese as China’s detention of Ai Weiwei was in its second month. The arrangement prompts the question: Is it appropriate for an American art museum to be engaged in this kind of transaction with the Chinese when the Chinese have demonstrated their hostility to — and fear of — their country’s most internationally prominent artist?

Earlier this week I talked with VMFA director Alex Nyerges about his museum’s arrangement with the Chinese. Click here to read our Q&A.