The art: Charles Ray, Fall ‘91, 1992.
The news: "Why Women Still Can’t Have It All," by Anne-Marie Slaughter on The Atlantic and as discussed on NPR’s Fresh Air.
The source: Collection of the Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.

The art: Charles Ray, Fall ‘91, 1992.

The news: "Why Women Still Can’t Have It All," by Anne-Marie Slaughter on The Atlantic and as discussed on NPR’s Fresh Air.

The source: Collection of the Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.

Posted by modernartnotes
June 26, 2012 4:04pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yOAWqJ4
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The art: Shirin Aliabadi, Hybrid Girl 6, 2008.
The news: "The Iran We Don’t See: A Tour of the Country Where People Love Americans," by Christopher Thornton for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Included in the 2008 exhibition “Made in Iran” at Asia House, London.

The art: Shirin Aliabadi, Hybrid Girl 6, 2008.

The news: "The Iran We Don’t See: A Tour of the Country Where People Love Americans," by Christopher Thornton for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Included in the 2008 exhibition “Made in Iran” at Asia House, London.

The art: Vanessa Beecroft, VB 31 Performance, 1998. 
The news: "What the US Can — and Can’t — Learn from Israel’s Ban on Ultra-Thin Models," by Talya Minsberg for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of the Fotomuseum Winterthur. 

The art: Vanessa Beecroft, VB 31 Performance, 1998. 

The news: "What the US Can — and Can’t — Learn from Israel’s Ban on Ultra-Thin Models," by Talya Minsberg for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of the Fotomuseum Winterthur. 

Posted by modernartnotes
May 16, 2012 9:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yLadn0N
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The art: Edouard Manet, Design for the poster and cover of The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe, translated/published by Stephane Mallarme, 1875.
The news: "Pop Culture’s Undying Edgar Allan Poe Obsession," by Scott Meslow for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Click here for more from Manet’s ‘The Raven.’ 

The art: Edouard Manet, Design for the poster and cover of The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe, translated/published by Stephane Mallarme, 1875.

The news: "Pop Culture’s Undying Edgar Allan Poe Obsession," by Scott Meslow for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Click here for more from Manet’s ‘The Raven.’ 

The art: Betye Saar, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima, 1972.
The news: "New Racism Museum Reveals the Ugly Truth Behind Aunt Jemima," by Jennie Rothenberg Gritz for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of the Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley, Calif.

The art: Betye Saar, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima, 1972.

The news: "New Racism Museum Reveals the Ugly Truth Behind Aunt Jemima," by Jennie Rothenberg Gritz for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of the Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley, Calif.

Posted by modernartnotes
April 23, 2012 2:43pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yKAuVGG
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Filed under: art racism museum The Atlantic 
The art: Top: Pirkle Jones, Town of Monticello, Early Spring, 1956, from the series “Death of a Valley,” 1956. Bottom: Unknown photographer for Eastman’s Originals, Berryessa Lake, Monticello Dam, California, 1960.
The news: "The Green Elite: The Top 10 States for Renewable Power," by Jordan Weissmann for TheAtlantic.com. Each of the top 10’s leading source of power is hydroconventional. 
The source: The Pirkle Jones picture is from the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The photo from the Eastman’s Originals Collection is in the special collections of the University of California, Davis, and was accessed via the indispensable Calisphere.
Critical note: In 1956 Pirkle Jones and Dorothea Lange collaborated on one of most underrated documentary projects of the post-war era: The evacuation and subsequent destruction of the Napa County town of Monticello, Calif. so that the federal Bureau of Reclamation could build Monticello Dam and create Lake Berryessa. Today the dam provides electricity to northern counties of the San Francisco Bay Area. 
The Jones-Lange project, titled “Death of a Valley,” was featured in a special issue of Aperture magazine in 1960.

The art: Top: Pirkle Jones, Town of Monticello, Early Spring, 1956, from the series “Death of a Valley,” 1956. Bottom: Unknown photographer for Eastman’s Originals, Berryessa Lake, Monticello Dam, California, 1960.

The news: "The Green Elite: The Top 10 States for Renewable Power," by Jordan Weissmann for TheAtlantic.com. Each of the top 10’s leading source of power is hydroconventional. 

The source: The Pirkle Jones picture is from the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The photo from the Eastman’s Originals Collection is in the special collections of the University of California, Davis, and was accessed via the indispensable Calisphere.

Critical note: In 1956 Pirkle Jones and Dorothea Lange collaborated on one of most underrated documentary projects of the post-war era: The evacuation and subsequent destruction of the Napa County town of Monticello, Calif. so that the federal Bureau of Reclamation could build Monticello Dam and create Lake Berryessa. Today the dam provides electricity to northern counties of the San Francisco Bay Area. 

The Jones-Lange project, titled “Death of a Valley,” was featured in a special issue of Aperture magazine in 1960.

The art: Gerrit Berckheyde, The Grote Markt and St. Bavokerk, 1696. 
The news: "Why People in Cities Walk Fast," by Eric Jaffe for The Atlantic Cities.
The source: Collection of the Frans Halsmuseum, Haarlem.
Note: Thinking about Eric Jaffe’s story reminded me that you pretty much never have a Dutch Golden Age market-scape without having people walking through it…

The art: Gerrit Berckheyde, The Grote Markt and St. Bavokerk, 1696. 

The news: "Why People in Cities Walk Fast," by Eric Jaffe for The Atlantic Cities.

The source: Collection of the Frans Halsmuseum, Haarlem.

Note: Thinking about Eric Jaffe’s story reminded me that you pretty much never have a Dutch Golden Age market-scape without having people walking through it…

Posted by modernartnotes
March 21, 2012 1:28pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yILJUen
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Filed under: art city The Atlantic 
The art: Edward Burtynsky, Manufacturing #10A and 10B, Cankun Factory, Xiamen City, 2005.
The news: "Why the United States Will Never, Ever Build the iPhone," by Jordan Weissmann for TheAtlantic.com and "How the U.S. Lost Out on iPhone Work," by Charles Duhigg and Keith Bradsher for The New York Times.
The source: EdwardBurtynsky.com

The art: Edward Burtynsky, Manufacturing #10A and 10B, Cankun Factory, Xiamen City, 2005.

The news: "Why the United States Will Never, Ever Build the iPhone," by Jordan Weissmann for TheAtlantic.com and "How the U.S. Lost Out on iPhone Work," by Charles Duhigg and Keith Bradsher for The New York Times.

The source: EdwardBurtynsky.com

Posted by modernartnotes
January 24, 2012 10:02am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yFI0YMB
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The art: Doug Aitken, last blast, 2008.
The news: "The Supreme Court and the Filthy Words You Still Can’t Say on TV," by Garrett Epps for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Galerie Eva Presenhuber.

The art: Doug Aitken, last blast, 2008.

The news: "The Supreme Court and the Filthy Words You Still Can’t Say on TV," by Garrett Epps for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Galerie Eva Presenhuber.

Posted by modernartnotes
January 11, 2012 9:31am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yEc2nua
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The art: Carleton Watkins, Three Chinese women wearing outfits and at their back walking, undated, though likely 1860s-1880s. From the album “San Francisco Views,” which features more photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown than any other single neighborhood.
The news: "The End of Chinatown," by Bonnie Tsui in December’s The Atlantic.
The source: Collection of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere. 
Related: America’s first great Chinatown was in San Francisco. Both Eadweard Muybridge and especially Watkins loved to photograph it, perhaps because it was different, even exotic. I’ll feature another Watkins later today.

The art: Carleton Watkins, Three Chinese women wearing outfits and at their back walking, undated, though likely 1860s-1880s. From the album “San Francisco Views,” which features more photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown than any other single neighborhood.

The news: "The End of Chinatown," by Bonnie Tsui in December’s The Atlantic.

The source: Collection of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere. 

Related: America’s first great Chinatown was in San Francisco. Both Eadweard Muybridge and especially Watkins loved to photograph it, perhaps because it was different, even exotic. I’ll feature another Watkins later today.

The art: Carleton Watkins, A Chinese Man Sitting at a Table, undated, though likely 1860s-1880s. From the album “San Francisco Views,” which features more photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown than any other single neighborhood.
The news: "The End of Chinatown," by Bonnie Tsui in December’s The Atlantic.
The source: Collection of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere. 
Related: America’s first great Chinatown was in San Francisco. Both Eadweard Muybridge and especially Watkins loved to photograph it, perhaps because it was different, even exotic. I’ll feature another Watkins later today.

The art: Carleton Watkins, A Chinese Man Sitting at a Table, undated, though likely 1860s-1880s. From the album “San Francisco Views,” which features more photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown than any other single neighborhood.

The news: "The End of Chinatown," by Bonnie Tsui in December’s The Atlantic.

The source: Collection of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere. 

Related: America’s first great Chinatown was in San Francisco. Both Eadweard Muybridge and especially Watkins loved to photograph it, perhaps because it was different, even exotic. I’ll feature another Watkins later today.

The art: Leon Golub, Interrogation I, 1981.
The news: "Crazy Talk on Torture? Blame Obama," by Andrew Cohen for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif. Michael Glover breaks down the painting for The Independent (UK).

The art: Leon Golub, Interrogation I, 1981.

The news: "Crazy Talk on Torture? Blame Obama," by Andrew Cohen for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif. Michael Glover breaks down the painting for The Independent (UK).

Posted by modernartnotes
November 14, 2011 11:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yBwTXTx
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Filed under: art politics news torture The Atlantic 
The art: William Garnett, Plaster and Roofing, Lakewood, California, 1950.
The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities.
The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.
Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the third of those five posts. The first one is here, the second, the third, the fourth.
Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: William Garnett, Plaster and Roofing, Lakewood, California, 1950.

The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities.

The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the third of those five posts. The first one is here, the secondthe third, the fourth.

Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: William Garnett, Foundations and Slabs, Lakewood, California, 1950.
The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities.
The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.
Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the third of those five posts. The first one is here, the second, the third.
Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: William Garnett, Foundations and Slabs, Lakewood, California, 1950.

The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities.

The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the third of those five posts. The first one is here, the second, the third.

Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: William Garnett, Trenching Lakewood, California, 1950.
The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities. Note the similarity between Garnett’s photograph and the Federal Housing Authority’s graphic example of “bad” suburban development practice. As Badger notes in her piece, after about 1950, virtually no American developments were built with the pattern Garnett captures here. 
The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.
Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the second of those five posts. The first one is here.
Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: William Garnett, Trenching Lakewood, California, 1950.

The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities. Note the similarity between Garnett’s photograph and the Federal Housing Authority’s graphic example of “bad” suburban development practice. As Badger notes in her piece, after about 1950, virtually no American developments were built with the pattern Garnett captures here. 

The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the second of those five posts. The first one is here.

Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.