The art: William Garnett, Grading Lakewood, 1950.
The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities.
The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.
Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the first of those five posts.
Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: William Garnett, Grading Lakewood, 1950.

The news: "Debunking the Cul-De-Sac," by Emily Badger for The Atlantic Cities.

The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Nota bene: Today 3rd of May will feature five William Garnett 1950 photographs of the construction of what would become Lakewood, California. This is the first of those five posts.

Garnett is one of America’s most underrated photographers, a forerunner of the photographic movement known as the New Topographics, which documented the ways in which America was transforming the West — and America — through rapacious land-use policies. Garnett is best-known for his aerial photographs, pictures that adapted aerial military photography pioneered by Edward Steichen and others to examine post-war America. The from-above vantage point was later further popularized by Google Satellite.

The art: Bruce Conner, THE CHILD, 1959-60.
The news: "Texas Toast: Rick Perry’s Death Penalty Calendar," by Andrew Cohen on TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Historical note: “Conner was outraged at the death sentence given to Caryl Chessman, who had been arrested in Los Angeles for rape and robbery, but who claimed that the confession he signed was the product of police brutality. (Despite worldwide protest, Chessman was eventually executed in 1960.) To protest this decision, Conner collected scavenged materials to create the assemblage THE CHILD (1959), which presents a shrunken, grotesquely gnarled, and mutilated man-child modeled in wax. The figure is wrapped in nylon hosiery and tied to a high chair; a horrendous cry seems to come from the hole that has taken the place of a mouth. Here Conner revealed the death penalty as a relic of barbarism that mocks society’s claim to civilized status. To encounter THE CHILD in its original shape elicited a great frisson. The Museum of Modern Art, realizing its import, acquired it soon after it was made, but found this mordant sculpture so disturbing that it has almost never been on view. Unfortunately, it is now in a state of great disrepair. ” — excerpted from "Art of engagement: visual politics in California and beyond," by Peter Selz and Susan Landauer. 

The art: Bruce Conner, THE CHILD, 1959-60.

The news: "Texas Toast: Rick Perry’s Death Penalty Calendar," by Andrew Cohen on TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Historical note: “Conner was outraged at the death sentence given to Caryl Chessman, who had been arrested in Los Angeles for rape and robbery, but who claimed that the confession he signed was the product of police brutality. (Despite worldwide protest, Chessman was eventually executed in 1960.) To protest this decision, Conner collected scavenged materials to create the assemblage THE CHILD (1959), which presents a shrunken, grotesquely gnarled, and mutilated man-child modeled in wax. The figure is wrapped in nylon hosiery and tied to a high chair; a horrendous cry seems to come from the hole that has taken the place of a mouth. Here Conner revealed the death penalty as a relic of barbarism that mocks society’s claim to civilized status. To encounter THE CHILD in its original shape elicited a great frisson. The Museum of Modern Art, realizing its import, acquired it soon after it was made, but found this mordant sculpture so disturbing that it has almost never been on view. Unfortunately, it is now in a state of great disrepair. ” — excerpted from "Art of engagement: visual politics in California and beyond," by Peter Selz and Susan Landauer. 

Posted by modernartnotes
September 7, 2011 10:40am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y9FAtAV
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The art: Joan Miro, The Farm, 1921-22.
The news: "Inside Polyface Farm, Mecca of Sustainable Agriculture," by Andrea Gabor for TheAtlantic.com.
The source: Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. On view now in "Miro," a Joan Miro survey at the Tate Modern, London.

The art: Joan Miro, The Farm, 1921-22.

The news: "Inside Polyface Farm, Mecca of Sustainable Agriculture," by Andrea Gabor for TheAtlantic.com.

The source: Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. On view now in "Miro," a Joan Miro survey at the Tate Modern, London.

Posted by modernartnotes
July 26, 2011 12:37pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y7YBJU_
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The art: Bright Ugochukwu Eke, Acid Rain, 2009. (The piece’s materials include water, plastic bags and carbon. See here for more.)
The news: "Storms Brewing" by Elizabeth Kolbert in The New Yorker. "On Climate Change, GOP Candidates Race to the Fringe," by Conor Friedersdorf in The Atlantic.
The source: Rethinkclimate.org, the website for an exhibition organized in 2009 by the National Gallery of Denmark, Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center and the Alexandra Institute.

The art: Bright Ugochukwu Eke, Acid Rain, 2009. (The piece’s materials include water, plastic bags and carbon. See here for more.)

The news: "Storms Brewing" by Elizabeth Kolbert in The New Yorker. "On Climate Change, GOP Candidates Race to the Fringe," by Conor Friedersdorf in The Atlantic.

The source: Rethinkclimate.org, the website for an exhibition organized in 2009 by the National Gallery of Denmark, Den Frie Centre of Contemporary Art, Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center and the Alexandra Institute.

Posted by modernartnotes
June 10, 2011 9:16am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5yUJa3
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The art: Emily Jacir, Crossing Surda (a record of going to and from work), 2002. Four stills from a two-channel video installation, one 30 minute video and one 132 minute video. 
I can’t find any video to share, so here’s Jacir’s description of the piece: “Since March 2001, the Ramallah-Birzeit Road has been disrupted by a checkpoint manned by Israeli soldiers, APCs and sometimes tanks. This road was the last remaining open road connecting Ramallah with Birzeit University and approximately thirty Palestinian villages.
On December 9th, 2002, I decided to record my daily walk to work across the Surda checkpoint to Birzeit University. When the Israeli Occupation Army saw me filming my feet with my video camera, they stopped me and asked for my I.D. I gave them my American passport, and they threw it in the mud. They told me that this was ‘Israel’ and that it was a military zone and that no filming was allowed. They detained me at gunpoint in the winter rain next to their tank. After three hours, they confiscated my videotape and then released me. I watched the soldier slip my videotape into the pocket of his army pants. That night when I returned home, I cut a hole in my bag and put my video camera in the bag. I recorded my daily walk across Surda checkpoint, to and from work, for eight days.
All people including the disabled, elderly, and children must walk distances as far as two kilometers depending on the decisions of the Israeli army at any given time. When Israeli soldiers decide that there should be no movement on the road, they shoot live ammunition, tear gas, and sound bombs to disperse people from the checkpoint.”
The news: The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg has published a dozen or so blog posts in response to President Obama’s speech on the Middle East and North Africa. Highly recommended.
The source: Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London, Brooklyn Museum.

The art: Emily Jacir, Crossing Surda (a record of going to and from work), 2002. Four stills from a two-channel video installation, one 30 minute video and one 132 minute video. 

I can’t find any video to share, so here’s Jacir’s description of the piece: “Since March 2001, the Ramallah-Birzeit Road has been disrupted by a checkpoint manned by Israeli soldiers, APCs and sometimes tanks. This road was the last remaining open road connecting Ramallah with Birzeit University and approximately thirty Palestinian villages.

On December 9th, 2002, I decided to record my daily walk to work across the Surda checkpoint to Birzeit University. When the Israeli Occupation Army saw me filming my feet with my video camera, they stopped me and asked for my I.D. I gave them my American passport, and they threw it in the mud. They told me that this was ‘Israel’ and that it was a military zone and that no filming was allowed. They detained me at gunpoint in the winter rain next to their tank. After three hours, they confiscated my videotape and then released me. I watched the soldier slip my videotape into the pocket of his army pants. That night when I returned home, I cut a hole in my bag and put my video camera in the bag. I recorded my daily walk across Surda checkpoint, to and from work, for eight days.

All people including the disabled, elderly, and children must walk distances as far as two kilometers depending on the decisions of the Israeli army at any given time. When Israeli soldiers decide that there should be no movement on the road, they shoot live ammunition, tear gas, and sound bombs to disperse people from the checkpoint.”

The news: The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg has published a dozen or so blog posts in response to President Obama’s speech on the Middle East and North Africa. Highly recommended.

The source: Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London, Brooklyn Museum.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 20, 2011 10:42am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5HpoPu
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The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.
The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 
Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct storyof devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrativeas a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.
Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy"Destroy This Memory" here.
The source: Aperture Foundation.

The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.

The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 

Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct storyof devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrativeas a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.

Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy"Destroy This Memory" here.

The source: Aperture Foundation.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 17, 2011 1:27pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5CbD17
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The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.
The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 
Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct story of devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrative as a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.
Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy "Destroy This Memory" here.
The source: Aperture Foundation.

The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.

The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 

Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct story of devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrative as a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.

Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy "Destroy This Memory" here.

The source: Aperture Foundation.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 17, 2011 9:02am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5CJ6C2
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The art: Christopher Wool, Untitled, 1990.
The news: A United States special forces team has killed Osama bin Laden. ABC News has the first look inside bin Laden’s compound. The New Yorker’s coverage. The Atlantic doesn’t have a single page set up, but has a ton of coverage here, as does National Public Radio. 
The source: Collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art and Flickr user M.V. Jantzen.

The art: Christopher Wool, Untitled, 1990.

The news: A United States special forces team has killed Osama bin Laden. ABC News has the first look inside bin Laden’s compound. The New Yorker’s coverage. The Atlantic doesn’t have a single page set up, but has a ton of coverage here, as does National Public Radio. 

The source: Collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art and Flickr user M.V. Jantzen.

The art: Tina Barney, The Son, 1987.
The news: “Secret Fears of the Super-Rich: Does great wealth bring fulfillment? An ambitious study by Boston College suggests not. For the first time, researchers prompted the very rich - people with fortunes in excess of $25 million - to speak candidly about their lives. The result is a surprising litany of anxieties: their sense of isolation, their worries about work and love, and most of all, their fears for their children,” by Graeme Wood in The Atlantic.
The source: Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

The art: Tina Barney, The Son, 1987.

The news:Secret Fears of the Super-Rich: Does great wealth bring fulfillment? An ambitious study by Boston College suggests not. For the first time, researchers prompted the very rich - people with fortunes in excess of $25 million - to speak candidly about their lives. The result is a surprising litany of anxieties: their sense of isolation, their worries about work and love, and most of all, their fears for their children,” by Graeme Wood in The Atlantic.

The source: Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Posted by modernartnotes
April 6, 2011 1:06pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y45sZro
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Filed under: art, The Atlantic rich super-rich 

The art: Emily Jacir, Rizek, a detail from Where We Come From, 2001-2003.

The news: “‘Miral’: Taking the Israel-Palestine Conflict Personally,” by Anna Louie Sussman for The Atlantic. The piece is a discussion of Julian Schnabel’s new film “Miral,” which examines the Israel-Palestine conflict from the point of view of a young girl and then follows her as she moves through her life. A decade ago, Jacir used a similarly personalizing, often young-people-focused strategy in Where We Come From.

The source: Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 28, 2011 9:49am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y3tvnJP
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Filed under: art The Atlantic SFMOMA 
The art: Juan Capistran, Do You Want New Wave or do you Want the Truth? from the series The Minutemen Project, 2007. For information about the images that make up Capistran’s ‘flag,’ see here.
The news: "Census Data Show Signs of a Hispanic Boom," by Chris Good on TheAtlantic.com
The source: Modern Art Notes.

The art: Juan Capistran, Do You Want New Wave or do you Want the Truth? from the series The Minutemen Project, 2007. For information about the images that make up Capistran’s ‘flag,’ see here.

The news: "Census Data Show Signs of a Hispanic Boom," by Chris Good on TheAtlantic.com

The source: Modern Art Notes.

Posted by modernartnotes
February 17, 2011 1:25pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y37WU-9
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Filed under: The Atlantic art 
The art: Bruce Nauman, South American Triangle, 1981.
The news: "A Note on Egyptian Torture," by Brian Till on TheAtlantic.com. More on Modern Art Notes on Nauman and his interest in torture.
The source: Collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

The art: Bruce Nauman, South American Triangle, 1981.

The news: "A Note on Egyptian Torture," by Brian Till on TheAtlantic.com. More on Modern Art Notes on Nauman and his interest in torture.

The source: Collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Posted by modernartnotes
February 2, 2011 3:38pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y2tA5bR
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This isn’t exactly what we do here at 3rd of May,  but it’s related to it: Here’s an image by a photojournalist (the  Associated Press’ Lefteris Pitarkis) that reveals important details  about a society and a moment. The Atlantic’s Garance Franke-Ruta explains why this picture is such a big deal.

This isn’t exactly what we do here at 3rd of May, but it’s related to it: Here’s an image by a photojournalist (the Associated Press’ Lefteris Pitarkis) that reveals important details about a society and a moment. The Atlantic’s Garance Franke-Ruta explains why this picture is such a big deal.

Posted by modernartnotes
February 1, 2011 8:47am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y2rhmPK
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