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Phyllida Barlow, most recently seen in the United States in the just-closed Carnegie International, has fulfilled a major commission for the Tate. The exhibition goes on view today and will be up through October 19. The image above is a detail from the installation, which is titled dock (2014).

Barlow was the guest for the full hour of Episode No. 109 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast. All of us here at The MAN Podcast think it’s one of our very best shows. 

Listen to or download Phyllida Barlow on The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

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March 31, 2014 2:55pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BkTxwD
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

Early in his career Heinecken made a number of ‘photograph-sculptures’ in which he presented human forms on an armature that insisted upon viewer interaction. This is Figure in Six Selections (1965), which asks a viewer to arrange a woman’s body as a painter or photographer might ask a model to arrange herself. 

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Julie Mehretu. She is currently exhibiting new work at two venues: New York’s Marian Goodman Gallery (through June 22) and London’s White Cube (through July 7).

Mehretu has received solo exhibitions at the Guggenheim, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León and the Walker Art Center. In 2005 she won a MacArthur ‘genius’ fellowship.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. Special thanks to Anna Brooke and the team at the Hirshhorn library for their help.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See (many, many) more images of art discussed on the program.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 30, 2013 2:05pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6ymBm3RW
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Philip Taaffe. An exhibition of Taaffe’s most recent work is on view at Luhring Augustine gallery in Chelsea through June 15. Taaffe has re-designed his website just in time for the show. Among the better artist websites, it features most (if not all) of the paintings he’s made since 1980.

Taaffe’s work engages cultural, natural and art history, often all at once. Taaffe’s work is in the collection of major museums such as the Museum of Modern Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. A 2001 survey of his work was launched by the Galleria Civica of Trento, Italy.

This is a detail from Taaffe’s Monocled Cobra (1996). On this week’s show, Taaffe and MAN Podcast host Tyler Green discuss Taaffe’s longtime interest in and use of snakes in his paintings. One reason? This Matisse.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 6, 2013 9:48am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6ykMk_g4
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Wangechi Mutu. The Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University is currently showing “Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey,” the first mid-career survey of Mutu’s work. Curated by the Nasher’s Trevor Schoonmaker, the exhibition is on view through July 21. On May 23 the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia in Sydney will debut a concurrent (but obviously different) Mutu survey. It will be up through August 14.

Mutu was born in Nairobi, Kenya, schooled in Wales and New York and lives in Brooklyn. Her work, which began as mostly collage-based but has evolved to include sculpture and room-sized installations. The winner of the 2010 Deutsche Bank “Artist of the Year,” Mutu has been featured in solo exhibitions at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Pace, the Miami Art MuseumKunsthalle Wien, the Art Gallery of Ontario and more.

This is a detail from Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) from the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

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This is a detail from Deb Sokolow’s Many Organizations (2013), part of her new exhibition at Chicago’s Western Exhibitions gallery. 

Sokolow’s art typically presents bizarre fictional narratives in a series of graphic forms. In this case, Western Exhibitions describes the first gallery of her show — in which this piece is included — as featuring “unframed collage drawings, artists books and a three-dimensional floor piece will focus on a variety of seemingly disparate topics: the inner workings of an international art theft organization known as “The Association”, a walk through nature which becomes less pleasant when rock formations begin to resemble the faces of former bosses, unexplained shrouded lumps on the floor, and the secret history of unconventional ingredients, such as troll meat, appearing in Philly cheesesteak sandwiches.”

Sokolow is the guest on the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. She’s also showing new work at the Wadsworth Atheneum in the museum’s latest “Matrix” exhibition. Click through to Sokolow’s own website to see more of her work!

How to listen to Sokolow on The MAN Podcast: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. 

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April 17, 2013 5:44pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yiwVqXC
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features painter Kaz Oshiro. His work is on view in “Lifelike” at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego. In art speak, “Lifelike” “invites a close examination of artworks based on commonplace objects and situations, which are startlingly realistic, often playful, and sometimes surreal. This international, multigenerational group exhibition features artists variously using scale, unusual materials, and sly contextual devices to reveal the manner in which their subjects’ ‘authenticity’ is manufactured.” (Or it’s a contemporary trompe l’oeil show.) Organized by the Walker Art Center and curated by Siri Engberg, it’s on view at MCASD through May 27.

Oshiro is exhibiting new work at Honor Fraser gallery in Los Angeles in an exhibition on view through May 25. This is an installation shot of Still Life (2013). Honor Fraser just posted 20 installation shots of Oshiro’s show here.

On the second segment,Deb Sokolow discusses her narrative drawings and installations. Her work is the subject of two ongoing exhibitions: “Some concerns about the candidate” a “Matrix” exhibition at the Wadsworth Atheneum through June 30; and in a solo exhibition at Chicago’s Western Exhibitions gallery. It’s on view through April 20.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. 

Posted by modernartnotes
April 15, 2013 12:02pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yilnGTj
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features two of the top exhibits of Italian art on view in the United States:  “Bernini: Sculpting in Clay” at the Kimbell Art Museum and “Piero della Francesca in America” at The Frick Collection. The first guest on the program is Kimbell curator of European art C.D. Dickerson III, who co-curated “Bernini” along with Frick director Ian Wardropper. Then “Piero” curator Nathaniel Silver joins me to discuss Piero. “Bernini” is at the Kimbell through April 14, while “Piero” is on view through May 19.

“Bernini” reveals how the artist developed his ideas in clay and on paper, ideas that resulted in some of the most dramatic statuary in Rome. It includes about 40 of Bernini’s terracotta sketch models together with about 30 drawings. Its rich catalogue was published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and is distributed by Yale University Press. Silver’s show is the first monographic exhibition of Piero in the United States. It brings together seven works at the Frick (and an eighth, which is unable to travel, in the catalogue).

This week’s program will also feature a special bonus: An extended clip of Llyn Foulkes playing his Machine at the Hammer Museum on Feb. 26. The Hammer is featuring a retrospective of Foulkes’ work through May 19. The Machine is a Foulkes-created one-man apparatus featuring lots of horns, a water jug, cowbells, organ pipes and plenty more. You can view the entire performance — and it’s a blast — on the Hammer’s website.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See images of art discussed on the program.

Image: Bernini, Head of Saint Jerome (detail), 1661. Collection of the Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, Mass.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 19, 2013 5:47pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6ygevD1e
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features two of the top exhibits of Italian art on view in the United States:  “Bernini: Sculpting in Clay” at the Kimbell Art Museum and “Piero della Francesca in America” at The Frick Collection. The first guest on the program is Kimbell curator of European art C.D. Dickerson III, who co-curated “Bernini” along with Frick director Ian Wardropper. Then “Piero” curator Nathaniel Silver joins me to discuss Piero. “Bernini” is at the Kimbell through April 14, while “Piero” is on view through May 19.

“Bernini” reveals how the artist developed his ideas in clay and on paper, ideas that resulted in some of the most dramatic statuary in Rome. It includes about 40 of Bernini’s terracotta sketch models together with about 30 drawings. Its rich catalogue was published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art and is distributed by Yale University Press. Silver’s show is the first monographic exhibition of Piero in the United States. It brings together seven works at the Frick (and an eighth, which is unable to travel, in the catalogue).

This is a detail from Piero’s Virgin and Child Enthroned with Four Angels, which is in the collection of the Clark Art Institute in Massachusetts. 

This week’s program will also feature a special bonus: An extended clip of Llyn Foulkes playing his Machine at the Hammer Museum on Feb. 26. The Hammer is featuring a retrospective of Foulkes’ work through May 19. The Machine is a Foulkes-created one-man apparatus featuring lots of horns, a water jug, cowbells, organ pipes and plenty more. You can view the entire performance — and it’s a blast — on the Hammer’s website.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See images of art discussed on the program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 18, 2013 9:03pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6ygb2M3_
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This screen-capture from the live webcam in the Museum of Modern Art’s atrium reveals that Wolfgang Laib’s Pollen from Hazelnut is just about installed! It opens to the public on Wednesday. At 18-by-21 feet, it will be the largest pollen field Laib has made. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Laib, who is installing not one but two major works in the U.S. this season. The second will be at The Phillips Collection, which will open the Laib Wax Room, a new permanent installation, on March 2. It will be the first permanent installation at the Phillips since the museum opened its Rothko Room in 1960.

Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artists Emmet Gowin and Frank Gohlke. Their photographs taken after the 1980 eruption of Mount Saint Helens are on view at the Cleveland Museum of Art in the exhibition “American Vesuvius: The Aftermath of Mount Saint Helens by Frank Gohlke and Emmet Gowin.” The show opens Sunday and is on view through May 12.

On May 18, 1980 Mount Saint Helens erupted with a force equivalent to 1,600 of the atomic bombs that decimated Hiroshima, Japan. The eruption killed nearly sixty people and destroyed or damaged over 60,000 acres of wilderness. 

This is a detail from one of Gohlke’s 1982 pictures of the area near Mount Saint Helens. It’s one of several pictures in which Gohlke presents a dramtically tilted landscape, a la Timothy O’Sullivan. On this week’s MAN Podcast, I asked Gohlke if he was consciously dipping into O’Sullivan’s bag of tricks, or if he was reflexively responding to the landscape he was in.

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. To see dozens of images of the works discussed on this week’s program, visit Modern Art Notes.

Image: Frank Gohlke, Looking SW across Blowdown toward Valley of South Toutle River, 8 miles NW of Mount St. Helens, Washington (detail), 1982. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Rebecca Rabinow. She’s one of the three co-curators of “Matisse: In Pursuit of Pure Painting” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The exhibition, which demonstrates how Matisse often worked through an idea in two separate paintings, is on view at the Metropolitan through March 17. 

This is a detail from 1899’s Still Life with Compote with Fruit, one of the two earliest paintings in the show. It reveals Matisse, who was still relatively new to art, working through Cezanne and trying to make a Matisse. It’s hung with a similar 1899 painting now in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art. 

To download the program to your PC/mobile device or to listen in your browser, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS.

To see more images of art discussed on this week’s show, click through to the Met’s excellent web pages on the Matisse show. Almost every painting in the show is available here. 

Image: Matisse, Still Life with Compote and Fruit, 1899. Collection of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in St. Louis.

Posted by modernartnotes
January 3, 2013 6:54pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yauhphx
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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features critic and author Jonathan Jones. His new book, “The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance,” has just been published in the United States.

It tells one of the best stories in art history: The story of the rivalry between Leonardo and Michelangelo at the dawn of the Renaissance, specifically the story of how the Florentine republic commissioned each of them to make a major battle painting in Florence in the early 1500s. Jones re-tells the story of their rivalry with flair, vigor and detail. His story kicks off with the siting of Michelangelo’s David (above) in a prominent space in Florence.

On the second segment, Saint Louis Art Museum curator Judith Mann talks about her new exhibition, “Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master.” It’s on view through January 20, 2013 at SLAM before traveling to the National Gallery in London next year. The exhibition is accompanied by a thorough, intense, richly illustrated catalogue published by the Yale University Press. The show presents the little-known-in-America Barocci as a key pivot between Florentine mannerism and the Roman Baroque style. Check out videos of the exhibition here.

Download the program to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See images of artworks discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
December 21, 2012 7:44pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yZt2fEn
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There are just two weeks left to see “Manet: Portraying Life,” a new exhibition of Edouard Manet’s portraits at the Toledo Museum of Art. It is the first exhibition devoted to Manet’s portraiture. Toledo organized the exhibition in association with the Royal Academy in London, where it will open on Jan. 26, 2013.

Episode No. 48 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast was devoted to Manet’s portraiture. The guests were exhibition co-curator Lawrence Nichols, the senior curator of European and American painting and sculpture before 1900 at Toledo and Gary Tinterow, the former head of 19th-century, modern and contemporary art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and now the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. While at the Met, Tinterow was the curator of the 2002 exhibition “Manet/Velazquez: The French Taste for Spanish Painting.”

Download the program to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. See more images of Manets discussed on the program.

Image: Edouard Manet, Portrait of Zacharie Astruc (detail), 1866. Collection of the Kunsthalle Bremen.

Posted by modernartnotes
December 17, 2012 11:57am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yZY7fRN
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On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, we initiate a series of interviews about Richard Serra’s Shift (1971-72, at left), one of the most important earthworks. Shift is in King City, Ontario, where the province’s failure to grant it landmark status has left the work endangered by encroaching exurban development. (Remarkably, an Ontario preservation board recently ruled that Shift has no heritage value to the community.) Shift is the contemporary masterpiece under the greatest threat.

Our series of segments on Shift kicks off with Richard Serra himself. Serra has spoken sparingly about Shift in recent years, but when he was a guest on Episode No. 18 of The MAN Podcast he talked about it at length, particularly in terms of its close relationship to his concurrent Pulitzer Piece and how the work emerged out of conversations with Joan Jonas and Philip Glass. This week’s show features a re-air of the part of our conversation during which Serra discusses Shift, its history and its future.

Download the program to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See images of artworks discussed on the show.