Today the New York Times published three letters from prominent gay thinkers on topical issues. On a recent Modern Art Notes Podcast, Lari Pittman talked extensively about being a gay man who channels his thoughts and experiences onto canvas. I think it’s one of our best shows, so don’t miss it below!

manpodcast:

This is the last weekend in Chicago for the exhibition “This Will Have Been,” an show that looks at how artists responded to the crises of the 1980s. The exhibition, curated by Helen Molesworth, pays special attention to how feminism motivated American artists to make sociopolitically engaged work. 

I haven’t seen the show, but I’ve read the outstanding catalogue. It seems to me that the key work in the show is Lari Pittman’s The Veneer of Order (1985, above, click to enlarge). Pittman and I discussed that painting and how his art is motivated by the politics of personhood on a really great show that first aired back in March. Don’t miss it — I think it’s one of the best MAN Podcast artist interviews! 

“This Will Have Been” will travel next to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, where it opens on June 30.

You may download the program directly to your PC/mobile device here. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast on iTunes here.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 30, 2012 11:10am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yMQMyia
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The art: David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (One day this kid…), 1990.
The news: "Mitt Romney, Reformed Bully?" by Andrew Rosenthal on NYTimes.com. Unreal.
The source: Collection of the Jersey City Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Wadsworth Atheneum, Smith College, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The art: David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (One day this kid…), 1990.

The news: "Mitt Romney, Reformed Bully?" by Andrew Rosenthal on NYTimes.com. Unreal.

The source: Collection of the Jersey City Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Wadsworth Atheneum, Smith College, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 11, 2012 1:25pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yLHqTmM
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The art: Tina Fiveash, Twilight Lovers, 1994.
The news: "Support for Same-Sex Marriage is Up," by Andrew Rosenthal for NYTimes.com.
The source: Tinafiveash.com.au.
Artist’s note: “Inspired by ‘Girl’s Own’ annuals and the Australian Women’s Weekly magazine from the 1950s, Stories for Girls is a tongue-in-cheek attempt to recreate missing lesbian photographic history from an era where homosexuality was a criminal offense, and lesbians were forced to remain in the closet and keep their relationships hidden from society.”

The art: Tina Fiveash, Twilight Lovers, 1994.

The news: "Support for Same-Sex Marriage is Up," by Andrew Rosenthal for NYTimes.com.

The source: Tinafiveash.com.au.

Artist’s note: “Inspired by ‘Girl’s Own’ annuals and the Australian Women’s Weekly magazine from the 1950s, Stories for Girls is a tongue-in-cheek attempt to recreate missing lesbian photographic history from an era where homosexuality was a criminal offense, and lesbians were forced to remain in the closet and keep their relationships hidden from society.”

Posted by modernartnotes
April 26, 2012 3:21pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yKM-xzD
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manpodcast:

At the left is Charles Demuth’s great I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold (1928) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at right is Lari Pittman’s Untitled #9 (2007).
What’s the relationship between the two paintings? Pittman explains what the Demuth has to do with his painting — and what not — on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. Click here to read the story, and click through to download this week’s show!

manpodcast:

At the left is Charles Demuth’s great I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold (1928) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at right is Lari Pittman’s Untitled #9 (2007).

What’s the relationship between the two paintings? Pittman explains what the Demuth has to do with his painting — and what not — on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. Click here to read the story, and click through to download this week’s show!

Posted by modernartnotes
April 4, 2012 3:16pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yJ4coPP
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manpodcast:

Lari Pittman, This Expedition, Beloved and Despised, Continues Regardless, 1989. Collection of the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Lari Pittman. This is one of my very, very favorite Pittmans. It’s wonderfully defiant: It asserts the immutability of sexual desire and sexual orientation. Best of all, it does so with a Rauschenbergian smirk: Painting is decorative? Fine. I’ll embrace both painting and my sexual orientation by winking at a cliched stereotype: Gay men are decorative decorators. OK, here are some pretty flowers. None of these things are going away, so let’s all deal with them. And here, in my painting, we’re going to deal with them on my terms. On this week’s podcast, Pittman talks eloquently about biography and how it factors into his work. Don’t miss it. 
One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.” The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. [Aside: The Yale University Press-published catalogue for the show is fantastic — and it’s 40% off here.]
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here (or click on the image). To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program and see images of art discussed on this week’s show here.

manpodcast:

Lari Pittman, This Expedition, Beloved and Despised, Continues Regardless, 1989. Collection of the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Lari PittmanThis is one of my very, very favorite Pittmans. It’s wonderfully defiant: It asserts the immutability of sexual desire and sexual orientation. Best of all, it does so with a Rauschenbergian smirk: Painting is decorative? Fine. I’ll embrace both painting and my sexual orientation by winking at a cliched stereotype: Gay men are decorative decorators. OK, here are some pretty flowers. None of these things are going away, so let’s all deal with them. And here, in my painting, we’re going to deal with them on my terms. On this week’s podcast, Pittman talks eloquently about biography and how it factors into his work. Don’t miss it. 

One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.” The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. [Aside: The Yale University Press-published catalogue for the show is fantastic — and it’s 40% off here.]

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here (or click on the image). To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program and see images of art discussed on this week’s show here.

Posted by modernartnotes
April 2, 2012 10:39am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yIyxJ9U
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Filed under: art LGBT politics podcast 
manpodcast:

Lari Pittman, The Veneer of Order, 1985. Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Lari Pittman. One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985, above) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.”The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. [Aside: The Yale University Press-published catalogue for the show is fantastic — and it’s 40% off here.]
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art organized a mid-career survey of Pittman’s work in 1996. The show, which was curated by Howard Fox, traveled to the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston and to the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington. Last year Rizzoli published a gorgeous monograph on Pittman’s work. An exhibition of his newest paintings opens next month at Berlin’s Gerhardsen Gerner gallery.
Pittman and I discuss:
How much it meant to him that his longtime friend Mike Kelley hung a Pittman on his living-room wall;
Why his paintings have become more compositionally dense as he’s advanced in his career;
The impact of feminism on his work;
Why, at a time when artists who wished to engage sociopolitical topics made work in seemingly every medium but painting, Pittman chose to become a painter; and
How violence, both public and personal, often motivates his work.
During our conversation, Pittman references an episode of The Modern Art Notes Podcast that featured Mark Bradford. That episode is available here.
On the second segment of this week’s show, Crown Point Press founder Kathan Brown joins me to talk about Richard Diebenkorn’s printmaking practice. Many of Diebenkorn’s Crown Point-published prints are on view in “Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series,” which is on view now at the Orange County Museum of Art. I reviewed the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth’s presentation of the exhibition here.
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program and see images of art discussed on this week’s show here.
The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. This week’s Pittman interview was edited by Wilson Butterworth.

manpodcast:

Lari Pittman, The Veneer of Order, 1985. Collection of The Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, Calif.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Lari Pittman. One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985, above) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.”The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. [Aside: The Yale University Press-published catalogue for the show is fantastic — and it’s 40% off here.]

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art organized a mid-career survey of Pittman’s work in 1996. The show, which was curated by Howard Fox, traveled to the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston and to the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington. Last year Rizzoli published a gorgeous monograph on Pittman’s work. An exhibition of his newest paintings opens next month at Berlin’s Gerhardsen Gerner gallery.

Pittman and I discuss:

  • How much it meant to him that his longtime friend Mike Kelley hung a Pittman on his living-room wall;
  • Why his paintings have become more compositionally dense as he’s advanced in his career;
  • The impact of feminism on his work;
  • Why, at a time when artists who wished to engage sociopolitical topics made work in seemingly every medium but painting, Pittman chose to become a painter; and
  • How violence, both public and personal, often motivates his work.

During our conversation, Pittman references an episode of The Modern Art Notes Podcast that featured Mark Bradford. That episode is available here.

On the second segment of this week’s show, Crown Point Press founder Kathan Brown joins me to talk about Richard Diebenkorn’s printmaking practice. Many of Diebenkorn’s Crown Point-published prints are on view in “Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series,” which is on view now at the Orange County Museum of Art. I reviewed the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth’s presentation of the exhibition here.

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program and see images of art discussed on this week’s show here.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. This week’s Pittman interview was edited by Wilson Butterworth.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 29, 2012 3:28pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yIlfekq
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Filed under: art podcast lgbt politics