The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.
The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 
Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct storyof devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrativeas a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.
Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy"Destroy This Memory" here.
The source: Aperture Foundation.

The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.

The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 

Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct storyof devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrativeas a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.

Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy"Destroy This Memory" here.

The source: Aperture Foundation.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 17, 2011 1:27pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5CbD17
(View comments  
The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.
The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 
Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct story of devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrative as a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.
Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy "Destroy This Memory" here.
The source: Aperture Foundation.

The art: Richard Misrach, Untitled, from the series “Destroy This Memory,” 2005.

The news: The Atlantic’s Alan Taylor-edited In Focus picture-blog featured Julie Dermansky’s pictures of Alabama after the tornadoes yesterday. Dermansky shot and Taylor included plenty of devastation porn, but both photographer and editor were particularly drawn to the messages people spray-painted onto homes, automobiles, plywood, cardboard and wherever else. Many of them are religious in nature. 

Dermansky’s photos reminded me of photographer Richard Misrach’s post-Hurricane Katrina project. Titled “Destroy This Memory,” Misrach’s project built a 69-photograph narrative out of the messages New Orleans residents spray-painted onto available surfaces after the storm. The result is a strikingly clear, direct story of devastation, pain, loss and hope. Aperture published Misrach’s photo-narrative as a book last year (Misrach’s royalties go to the Make it Right Foundation). In addition, Misrach gave complete sets of the series to five museums: The the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the National Gallery of Art, MoMA and SFMOMA.

Modern Art Notes’ two-part review of Misrach’s book is here and here. You can buy "Destroy This Memory" here.

The source: Aperture Foundation.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 17, 2011 9:02am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y5CJ6C2
(View comments  
The art: Mark Bradford, Help Us, 2008. As installed at the 2008 Carnegie International in Pittsburgh. For more on Help Us and its relationship to New Orleans, Katrina and George W. Bush, click here, here and here. 
The news: "Why was New Orleans’ Charity Hospital Allowed to Die," by Roberta Brandes Gratz for The Nation. 
The source: The Carnegie Museum of Art’s Flickr stream.

The art: Mark Bradford, Help Us, 2008. As installed at the 2008 Carnegie International in Pittsburgh. For more on Help Us and its relationship to New Orleans, Katrina and George W. Bush, click here, here and here. 

The news: "Why was New Orleans’ Charity Hospital Allowed to Die," by Roberta Brandes Gratz for The Nation. 

The source: The Carnegie Museum of Art’s Flickr stream.