Today the New York Times published three letters from prominent gay thinkers on topical issues. On a recent Modern Art Notes Podcast, Lari Pittman talked extensively about being a gay man who channels his thoughts and experiences onto canvas. I think it’s one of our best shows, so don’t miss it below!

manpodcast:

This is the last weekend in Chicago for the exhibition “This Will Have Been,” an show that looks at how artists responded to the crises of the 1980s. The exhibition, curated by Helen Molesworth, pays special attention to how feminism motivated American artists to make sociopolitically engaged work. 

I haven’t seen the show, but I’ve read the outstanding catalogue. It seems to me that the key work in the show is Lari Pittman’s The Veneer of Order (1985, above, click to enlarge). Pittman and I discussed that painting and how his art is motivated by the politics of personhood on a really great show that first aired back in March. Don’t miss it — I think it’s one of the best MAN Podcast artist interviews! 

“This Will Have Been” will travel next to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, where it opens on June 30.

You may download the program directly to your PC/mobile device here. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast on iTunes here.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 30, 2012 11:10am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yMQMyia
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features painter Lari Pittman. One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985, above or left) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.” The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. 

On the second segment of this week’s show, Crown Point Press founder Kathan Brown joins me to talk about Richard Diebenkorn’s printmaking practice. Many of Diebenkorn’s Crown Point-published prints are on view in “Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series,” which is on view now at the Orange County Museum of Art. I reviewed the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth’s presentation of the exhibition here.

Click here to download the program directly to your PC/mobile device.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 29, 2012 12:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yIlEwID
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Filed under: art podcast GLBT politics 80s 
The art: Sam Durant. We Are The People, installation view at Project Row House, Houston, TX, 2003.
The news: "Postscript: Franklin Kameny," by Amy Davidson for The New Yorker’s website. The picture that runs with Davidson’s story is one of the most famous human rights photos in American history. Kameny is the second figure from the right.
Durant’s work about protest signs comes directly from protests such as the ones Kameny helped lead at the White House.
It may well be that no one in America is more responsible for increasing equality for gays and lesbians here than Frank Kameny. Read everything about him you can. RIP.
The source: Blum & Poe.

The art: Sam Durant. We Are The People, installation view at Project Row House, Houston, TX, 2003.

The news: "Postscript: Franklin Kameny," by Amy Davidson for The New Yorker’s website. The picture that runs with Davidson’s story is one of the most famous human rights photos in American history. Kameny is the second figure from the right.

Durant’s work about protest signs comes directly from protests such as the ones Kameny helped lead at the White House.

It may well be that no one in America is more responsible for increasing equality for gays and lesbians here than Frank Kameny. Read everything about him you can. RIP.

The source: Blum & Poe.

Posted by modernartnotes
October 13, 2011 3:48pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yAdkKzN
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Filed under: art activism obits news GLBT