manpodcast:

Carleton Watkins, Mission Santa Barbara, ca. 1877. Collection of Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, Calif. 
Today the Mission Santa Barbara looks like this. 
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Huntington curator Jennifer A. Watts, a leading expert on Carleton Watkins. Watts contributed two essays to “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs,” which was recently published by the Getty. I reviewed the book here and included it in my 2011 top ten list here. In our conversation we pay special attention to Watkins’s California Missions Project. The Huntington is one of three institutions to have a complete set of the pictures. 
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. For more images and more on the program, click here.
In this week’s draft, The Stranger art critic Jen Graves and I burrow into “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs” to pick some favorite individual artworks. Graves reviewed the book here.

manpodcast:

Carleton Watkins, Mission Santa Barbara, ca. 1877. Collection of Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, San Marino, Calif. 

Today the Mission Santa Barbara looks like this. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Huntington curator Jennifer A. Watts, a leading expert on Carleton Watkins. Watts contributed two essays to “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs,” which was recently published by the Getty. I reviewed the book here and included it in my 2011 top ten list here. In our conversation we pay special attention to Watkins’s California Missions Project. The Huntington is one of three institutions to have a complete set of the pictures. 

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. For more images and more on the program, click here.

In this week’s draft, The Stranger art critic Jen Graves and I burrow into “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs” to pick some favorite individual artworks. Graves reviewed the book here.

Posted by modernartnotes
January 4, 2012 9:34am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yEFgdga
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Huntington curator Jennifer A. Watts, a leading expert on Carleton Watkins. Watts contributed two essays to “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs,” which was recently published by the Getty. I reviewed the book here and included it in my 2011 top ten list here.
Watts’s essays address two of Watkins’s lesser-known series: his California missions photographs and his pictures of southern California and Kern County. The Huntington has over 300 Watkins mammoth-plate pictures and hundreds of other Watkinses, making it the second-largest repository of Watkins’ art.
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program through the player below.
In our conversation, Watts and I discuss:
The genesis and the particular challenges of Watkins’ California Missions Project;
New research regarding the relationship between Watkins and his patron and fellow Oneonta, New York native Collis P. Huntington;
The discovery of a third print of a Watkins masterpiece;
Why Watkins, mostly famed for his photographs of Yosemite, the Sierra Nevada, the Pacific Northwest and San Francisco, finally traveled to Southern California late in his career; and
Whether Watkins essentially created the photographic series.
In this week’s draft, The Stranger art critic Jen Graves and I burrow into “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs” to pick some favorite individual artworks. Graves reviewed the book here.
The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. For images of the works discussed on this week’s program, click here.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Huntington curator Jennifer A. Watts, a leading expert on Carleton Watkins. Watts contributed two essays to “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs,” which was recently published by the Getty. I reviewed the book here and included it in my 2011 top ten list here.

Watts’s essays address two of Watkins’s lesser-known series: his California missions photographs and his pictures of southern California and Kern County. The Huntington has over 300 Watkins mammoth-plate pictures and hundreds of other Watkinses, making it the second-largest repository of Watkins’ art.

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program through the player below.

In our conversation, Watts and I discuss:

  • The genesis and the particular challenges of Watkins’ California Missions Project;
  • New research regarding the relationship between Watkins and his patron and fellow Oneonta, New York native Collis P. Huntington;
  • The discovery of a third print of a Watkins masterpiece;
  • Why Watkins, mostly famed for his photographs of Yosemite, the Sierra Nevada, the Pacific Northwest and San Francisco, finally traveled to Southern California late in his career; and
  • Whether Watkins essentially created the photographic series.

In this week’s draft, The Stranger art critic Jen Graves and I burrow into “Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs” to pick some favorite individual artworks. Graves reviewed the book here.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. It is released under this Creative Commons license. For images of the works discussed on this week’s program, click here.

Posted by modernartnotes
December 29, 2011 12:26pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yDyvt_i
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The art: Carleton Watkins, Big River from the Rancherie, City of Mendocino, 1863. 
The news: “America’s Wild and Scenic Rivers: More than four decades after it became law, a little-known federal act safeguards hundreds of primordial waterways,” by Joel K. Bourne, Jr. for National Geographic Magazine.
The source: Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. Other prints are in the collection of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, Calif., and at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.
This Watkins is also included in "Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs," by Weston Naef and Christine Hult-Lewis with a team of contributors. This landmark book was just published by the J. Paul Getty Museum and Getty Publications.

The art: Carleton Watkins, Big River from the Rancherie, City of Mendocino, 1863. 

The news:America’s Wild and Scenic Rivers: More than four decades after it became law, a little-known federal act safeguards hundreds of primordial waterways,” by Joel K. Bourne, Jr. for National Geographic Magazine.

The source: Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. Other prints are in the collection of the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, Calif., and at the Huntington Library, San Marino, Calif.

This Watkins is also included in "Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs," by Weston Naef and Christine Hult-Lewis with a team of contributors. This landmark book was just published by the J. Paul Getty Museum and Getty Publications.

The art: Francisco de Goya, Bullfight, Suerte de Varas, 1824.
The news: "Tradition of the Azores takes root in Central Valley bullrings," by Diana Marcum in the Los Angeles Times.
The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.
Historical note: The bullfight is one of the great traditions of Spanish art (and I suppose southern French art too). This is by no means the most famous painting of a bullfight, but it’s one of my very favorites. It’s small, less than two feet square.

The art: Francisco de Goya, Bullfight, Suerte de Varas, 1824.

The news: "Tradition of the Azores takes root in Central Valley bullrings," by Diana Marcum in the Los Angeles Times.

The source: Collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

Historical note: The bullfight is one of the great traditions of Spanish art (and I suppose southern French art too). This is by no means the most famous painting of a bullfight, but it’s one of my very favorites. It’s small, less than two feet square.

Posted by modernartnotes
August 25, 2011 1:22pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y8l4C4i
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The art: Carleton Watkins, View from Caleb Carriger Orange Orchard, One Mile South of El Verano, Looking [East] Across Sonoma Valley, ca. 1887. According to the Online Archive of California, the Sonoma Valley Improvement Country hired Watkins to photograph the countryside and estates of the Sonoma Valley as a promotional tool. Best known for his dramatic mountain landscapes, Watkins’ pictures often showed the ways in which the federal government enabled or promoted new agricultural products in California. 
The news: "How Uncle Sam Helped Define America’s Diet," by Renee Montagne on NPR’s “Morning Edition.”
The source: Collection of The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere.

The art: Carleton Watkins, View from Caleb Carriger Orange Orchard, One Mile South of El Verano, Looking [East] Across Sonoma Valley, ca. 1887. According to the Online Archive of California, the Sonoma Valley Improvement Country hired Watkins to photograph the countryside and estates of the Sonoma Valley as a promotional tool. Best known for his dramatic mountain landscapes, Watkins’ pictures often showed the ways in which the federal government enabled or promoted new agricultural products in California. 

The news: "How Uncle Sam Helped Define America’s Diet," by Renee Montagne on NPR’s “Morning Edition.”

The source: Collection of The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, via Calisphere.

The art: Pirkle Jones, House Being Moved, from the series “Death of a Valley,” 1956 (printed 1960). Jones and Dorothea Lange collaborated on “Death of a Valley,” which chronicled the last days of Monticello, Calif., before the town and the surrounding Berryessa Valley were dammed into Lake Berryessa. The reservoir is sited west of Sacramento, about halfway between the state capital and the Napa Valley wine-growing region. It’s one of the least-known great narrative photo-documentary series in American art.
The news: "Water, water everywhere, but not enough is saved," by George Skelton in the Los Angeles Times. Skelton reports that California built its last dam in 1979. Since then the state’s population has increased by about 50 percent, or over 14 million people.
The source: Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. More of the series is online here.

The art: Pirkle Jones, House Being Moved, from the series “Death of a Valley,” 1956 (printed 1960). Jones and Dorothea Lange collaborated on “Death of a Valley,” which chronicled the last days of Monticello, Calif., before the town and the surrounding Berryessa Valley were dammed into Lake Berryessa. The reservoir is sited west of Sacramento, about halfway between the state capital and the Napa Valley wine-growing region. It’s one of the least-known great narrative photo-documentary series in American art.

The news: "Water, water everywhere, but not enough is saved," by George Skelton in the Los Angeles Times. Skelton reports that California built its last dam in 1979. Since then the state’s population has increased by about 50 percent, or over 14 million people.

The source: Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. More of the series is online here.

Posted by modernartnotes
April 4, 2011 9:52am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y42dk2S
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