manpodcast:

Lari Pittman, Thankfully, I will have had learned to break glass with sound, 1999. Collection of the Akron (Ohio) Art Museum.
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Lari Pittman.On the program, Pittman says that he doesn’t do drawings for his paintings or plan them out beforehand, except by writing sentences that detail what he wants to accomplish with a given work. Look at the compositional complexity of this painting and imagine not sketching…
One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.” The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. [Aside: The Yale University Press-published catalogue for the show is fantastic — and it’s 40% off here.]
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here (or click on the image). To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program and see images of art discussed on this week’s show here.

manpodcast:

Lari Pittman, Thankfully, I will have had learned to break glass with sound, 1999. Collection of the Akron (Ohio) Art Museum.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Lari Pittman.On the program, Pittman says that he doesn’t do drawings for his paintings or plan them out beforehand, except by writing sentences that detail what he wants to accomplish with a given work. Look at the compositional complexity of this painting and imagine not sketching…

One of Pittman’s most important paintings, The Veneer of Order (1985) is featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago exhibition “This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s.” The thesis of the exhibition, which was curated by Helen Molesworth, is that the political, often confrontational art of the 1980s had its roots in feminist art of the preceding decade. Pittman’s painting, and indeed his oeuvre, is a clear example of how feminist discourse and art motivated art in and after the ’80s. [Aside: The Yale University Press-published catalogue for the show is fantastic — and it’s 40% off here.]

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here (or click on the image). To download the program directly, click here. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. You can stream the program and see images of art discussed on this week’s show here.

Posted by modernartnotes
April 1, 2012 1:23pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6yIvgJ9D
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