manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

This is an untitled, undated off-set lithograph Heinecken made. It features a typical example of Heinecken using one of his ‘favorite’ news images — a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads — and presenting it in a single image with the sort of news magazine advertisement that would have ‘accompanied’ the photograph. This piece is in the collection of the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, Ariz.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 14, 2014 5:06pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1A7dzzl
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Filed under: art 
manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.
Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.
Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.
This is Heinecken’s Multiple Solution Puzzle (1965), which is in the MoMA retrospective (and which is discussed on this week’s program). It’s an example of how Heinecken loved to embrace — and encourage — chance in his work. Heinecken encouraged viewers to handle and arrange the work.
On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?
Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”
Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

This is Heinecken’s Multiple Solution Puzzle (1965), which is in the MoMA retrospective (and which is discussed on this week’s program). It’s an example of how Heinecken loved to embrace — and encourage — chance in his work. Heinecken encouraged viewers to handle and arrange the work.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 13, 2014 9:34pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1A3MwBq
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Filed under: art 

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

 Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Catherine Yass.

Her large-screen projection Lighthouse (2011) is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the exhibition “Fluid Motion.” The installation, which will remain on view through June, was curated by Al Miner. Later this year Lighthouse will go on view at the Museum of Modern Art, Vienna. The image above is an installation view of Lighthouse.

Yass’ exhibition credits include a 2011 mid-career retrospective at De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, England and presentations at Washington’s Phillips Collection, the Stedelijk-Hertogenbosch Museum and the Saint Louis Art Museum. Her work is in the collections of the Tate, The Jewish Museum, New York, The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, and the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. She was short-listed for the 2002 Turner Prize.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 11, 2014 9:55am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19qNubg
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manpodcast:

Tomorrow the J. Paul Getty Museum will place Jackson Pollock’s great Mural (1943) on view. For the last 20 months the painting has been undergoing conservation at the Getty Conservation Institute. The painting — which measures nearly 20 feet wide by eight feet tall — is in the collection of the University of Iowa Museum of Art.
Mural is the first Pollock painting to embrace what we now consider to be the ‘typical’ scale of abstract expressionism, and the painting in which Pollock to his first and most significant step toward his mature style. In 2011, Pollock scholar Pepe Karmel described it on Modern Art Notes as the painting in which Pollock “announces his future as a painter of large, mural-scale paintings that become environments, and furthermore paintings that are in this distinct, all-over style that changes people’s idea of what a painting might be.”
The Getty Conservation Institute has been conserving the painting since August, 2012. The GIF above shows what the painting looked like before the GCI’s treatments, and what it looks like today. 
With Mural returning to public view, our current program features Getty conservator Laura Rivers summing up the project and explaining what she and her colleagues have done to the painting and what they’ve learned from it. 
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

manpodcast:

Tomorrow the J. Paul Getty Museum will place Jackson Pollock’s great Mural (1943) on view. For the last 20 months the painting has been undergoing conservation at the Getty Conservation Institute. The painting — which measures nearly 20 feet wide by eight feet tall — is in the collection of the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

Mural is the first Pollock painting to embrace what we now consider to be the ‘typical’ scale of abstract expressionism, and the painting in which Pollock to his first and most significant step toward his mature style. In 2011, Pollock scholar Pepe Karmel described it on Modern Art Notes as the painting in which Pollock “announces his future as a painter of large, mural-scale paintings that become environments, and furthermore paintings that are in this distinct, all-over style that changes people’s idea of what a painting might be.”

The Getty Conservation Institute has been conserving the painting since August, 2012. The GIF above shows what the painting looked like before the GCI’s treatments, and what it looks like today. 

With Mural returning to public view, our current program features Getty conservator Laura Rivers summing up the project and explaining what she and her colleagues have done to the painting and what they’ve learned from it. 

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 10, 2014 4:05pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19m3nMT
(View comments  

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Catherine Yass.

Her large-screen projection Lighthouse (2011) is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the exhibition “Fluid Motion.” The installation, which will remain on view through June, was curated by Al Miner. Later this year Lighthouse will go on view at the Museum of Modern Art, Vienna. The image above is a still from Lighthouse.

Yass’ exhibition credits include a 2011 mid-career retrospective at De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, England and presentations at Washington’s Phillips Collection, the Stedelijk-Hertogenbosch Museum and the Saint Louis Art Museum. Her work is in the collections of the Tate, The Jewish Museum, New York, The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, and the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. She was short-listed for the 2002 Turner Prize.

On the second segment, the program airs the fourth of its four segments on the Getty Conservation Institute’s work on Jackson Pollock’s landmark Mural (1943). The painting is in the collection of the University of Iowa Museum of Art. GCI conservator Laura Rivers updates us on the work done on the painting and what Getty scientists learned about the creation of the artwork.

With the conservation of Mural complete, the painting will be on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from March 11 through June 1. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue that details the conservation of the painting. Amazon lists it at $20.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 7, 2014 5:25pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19Tto7u
(View comments  
Filed under: art 
manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Catherine Yass.
Her large-screen projection Lighthouse (2011) is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the exhibition “Fluid Motion.” The installation, which will remain on view through June, was curated by Al Miner. Later this year Lighthouse will go on view at the Museum of Modern Art, Vienna. The image above is a still from Lighthouse.
Yass’ exhibition credits include a 2011 mid-career retrospective at De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, England and presentations at Washington’s Phillips Collection, the Stedelijk-Hertogenbosch Museum and the Saint Louis Art Museum. Her work is in the collections of the Tate, The Jewish Museum, New York, The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, and the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. She was short-listed for the 2002 Turner Prize.
On the second segment, the program airs the fourth of its four segments on the Getty Conservation Institute’s work on Jackson Pollock’s landmark Mural (1943). The painting is in the collection of the University of Iowa Museum of Art. GCI conservator Laura Rivers updates us on the work done on the painting and what Getty scientists learned about the creation of the artwork.
With the conservation of Mural complete, the painting will be on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from March 11 through June 1. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue that details the conservation of the painting. Amazon lists it at $20.
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Catherine Yass.

Her large-screen projection Lighthouse (2011) is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the exhibition “Fluid Motion.” The installation, which will remain on view through June, was curated by Al Miner. Later this year Lighthouse will go on view at the Museum of Modern Art, Vienna. The image above is a still from Lighthouse.

Yass’ exhibition credits include a 2011 mid-career retrospective at De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, England and presentations at Washington’s Phillips Collection, the Stedelijk-Hertogenbosch Museum and the Saint Louis Art Museum. Her work is in the collections of the Tate, The Jewish Museum, New York, The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, and the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. She was short-listed for the 2002 Turner Prize.

On the second segment, the program airs the fourth of its four segments on the Getty Conservation Institute’s work on Jackson Pollock’s landmark Mural (1943). The painting is in the collection of the University of Iowa Museum of Art. GCI conservator Laura Rivers updates us on the work done on the painting and what Getty scientists learned about the creation of the artwork.

With the conservation of Mural complete, the painting will be on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from March 11 through June 1. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue that details the conservation of the painting. Amazon lists it at $20.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 7, 2014 10:26am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19RwLzN
(View comments  
Filed under: art 

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Catherine Yass.

Her large-screen projection Lighthouse (2011) is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the exhibition “Fluid Motion.” The installation, which will remain on view through June, was curated by Al Miner. Later this year Lighthouse will go on view at the Museum of Modern Art, Vienna.

Yass’ exhibition credits include a 2011 mid-career retrospective at De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill-on-Sea, England and presentations at Washington’s Phillips Collection, the Stedelijk-Hertogenbosch Museum and the Saint Louis Art Museum. Her work is in the collections of the Tate, The Jewish Museum, New York, The National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, and the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh. She was short-listed for the 2002 Turner Prize.

On the second segment, the program airs the fourth of its four segments on the Getty Conservation Institute’s work on Jackson Pollock’s landmark Mural (1943). The painting is in the collection of the University of Iowa Museum of Art. GCI conservator Laura Rivers updates us on the work done on the painting and what Getty scientists learned about the creation of the artwork.

With the conservation of Mural complete, the painting will be on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from March 11 through June 1. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue that details the conservation of the painting. Amazon lists it at $20.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 6, 2014 7:45pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19Okuel
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Filed under: art 
blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  This is “Nathan with Floral”, a Polaroid shot in 1962 or 63 by Marie Cosindas, and now in an eye-opening survey of similar works by her that closes in a few days at Bruce Silverstein Gallery in New York. Cosindas found some success in the 1960s and ’70s, thanks in part to support from John Szarkowski at MoMA (he gave her a solo there in 1966), then seems to have been mostly written out of photographic history.  What amazes me is that, among the rigors of Greenbergian abstraction, Minimalism and Conceptualism, the 1960s art world could also find room for Cosindas’s wonderfully fussy, decorative, retrospective and frankly camp sensibility. The camp part strikes me as especially important: I’m fairly certain that “Nathan” in this photo is Nathan Gluck, a gay assistant working in the openly queer environment of Warhol’s studio. (Cosindas also photographed Warhol himself, more than once, including for her “Dandies” series; like Warhol, and Gluck, she got her start amid the frippery of commercial art.)
Gay culture of the ’60s helped break open the boundaries of what kinds of art could count as acceptably avant-garde – absurd prettiness was allowed to challenge capital-B Beauty – and some female artists, such as Cosindas, could play a part in the shift.  The truth is, Cosindas’s aesthetic is more radically anti-modern than anything you’ll find even in Warhol, whose style, at its most cockeyed and queer, is still built on a backbone of Modernist rigor. (© Marie Cosindas, courtesy of Bruce Silverstein Gallery, NY)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  This is “Nathan with Floral”, a Polaroid shot in 1962 or 63 by Marie Cosindas, and now in an eye-opening survey of similar works by her that closes in a few days at Bruce Silverstein Gallery in New York. Cosindas found some success in the 1960s and ’70s, thanks in part to support from John Szarkowski at MoMA (he gave her a solo there in 1966), then seems to have been mostly written out of photographic history.  What amazes me is that, among the rigors of Greenbergian abstraction, Minimalism and Conceptualism, the 1960s art world could also find room for Cosindas’s wonderfully fussy, decorative, retrospective and frankly camp sensibility. The camp part strikes me as especially important: I’m fairly certain that “Nathan” in this photo is Nathan Gluck, a gay assistant working in the openly queer environment of Warhol’s studio. (Cosindas also photographed Warhol himself, more than once, including for her “Dandies” series; like Warhol, and Gluck, she got her start amid the frippery of commercial art.)

Gay culture of the ’60s helped break open the boundaries of what kinds of art could count as acceptably avant-garde – absurd prettiness was allowed to challenge capital-B Beauty – and some female artists, such as Cosindas, could play a part in the shift.  The truth is, Cosindas’s aesthetic is more radically anti-modern than anything you’ll find even in Warhol, whose style, at its most cockeyed and queer, is still built on a backbone of Modernist rigor. (© Marie Cosindas, courtesy of Bruce Silverstein Gallery, NY)

Posted by modernartnotes
March 5, 2014 4:58pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19HvImA
(View comments  

manpodcast:

The Hammer Museum recently opened a major historical survey titled "Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology." It describes the show as “the first large-scale exhibition to focus on the intersection of two vitally important genres of contemporary art: appropriation (taking and recasting existing images, forms, and styles from mass-media and fine art sources) and institutional critique (scrutinizing and confronting the structures and practices of our social, cultural, and political institutions).”

One of the artists in the exhibition is Barbara Kruger, the New York-based conceptualist whose work often examines the intersection of marketing, design, want and gender. Wilson was the guest on Episode No. 36 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast, about when she debuted this continuing installation at Washington’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Have a listen, or download it using the button in the upper right above!

Subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Image: Barbara Kruger. Untitled (Hello/Goodbye), 2014.  Installation  at the Hammer Museum, January 27 – May 18, 2014. Photo by Brian Forrest.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 5, 2014 3:06pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19HH3Rb
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eastmanhouse:

Roger Fenton (British, 1819-1969) (Top) Sebastopol from Cathcart’s Hill, (Bottom) Balaklava, Looking Seaward, 1855, salted paper prints, printed 1856, Museum purchase; ex-collection of Alden Scott Boyer, George Eastman House Collection

Originally a barrister, Roger Fenton studied art with Gustave LeGray at the studio of Paul Delaroche in Paris.  He exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1849-1851. His book—Photographs of the Crimean War, 1855-1856—consisted of tipped in salted paper prints. Fenton was sent to the Crimea by the British Government in 1855 and brought back the first photographs of a war zone. 

Posted by modernartnotes
March 5, 2014 10:46am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19G7Xbw
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albrightknox:

In honor of Mardi Gras, two views of New Orleans photographed by the American artist Ralston Crawford (19061978).

Top(New Orleans Parade), 1956. Gelatin silver print. 
Jointly owned by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of John Crawford, 2009.
Bottom(Street, Shadows, New Orleans), 1973. Gelatin silver print. Jointly owned by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Gift of John Crawford, 2009. 

Posted by modernartnotes
March 4, 2014 12:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y19AQfmi
(View comments  
manpodcast:

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Blanton Museum of Art curator Veronica Roberts details her new exhibition "Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt," which examines the two artists’ friendship and the ways in which they informed each other’s work. The exhibition is accompanied by an excellent catalogue co-published by the Blanton and Yale University Press. It reproduces not only numerous works by the two artists, but marvelous examples of their correspondence. It’s available from Amazon for just $25.The exhibition is on view through May 18.
This is an image of the first page of a letter that LeWitt sent to a slightly distraught Eva Hesse in April, 1965. (Click to expand it.) Roberts reads from it on this week’s MAN Podcast and explains how other artists and teachers have shared it with others.
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

manpodcast:

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Blanton Museum of Art curator Veronica Roberts details her new exhibition "Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt," which examines the two artists’ friendship and the ways in which they informed each other’s work. The exhibition is accompanied by an excellent catalogue co-published by the Blanton and Yale University Press. It reproduces not only numerous works by the two artists, but marvelous examples of their correspondence. It’s available from Amazon for just $25.The exhibition is on view through May 18.

This is an image of the first page of a letter that LeWitt sent to a slightly distraught Eva Hesse in April, 1965. (Click to expand it.) Roberts reads from it on this week’s MAN Podcast and explains how other artists and teachers have shared it with others.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 3, 2014 3:31pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1956hTy
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe" at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. It is the first overview of Italian Futurism to be presented in the United States. It’s on view through September 1.

The first guest is Guggenheim curator Vivien Greene, who organized the show. Greene’s previous exhibitions include “The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914–18,” (which she co-organized with Mark Antliff), “Utopia Matters: From Brotherhoods to Bauhaus” and “Divisionism/Neo-Impressionism: Arcadia and Anarchy.”

This is a detail from Filippo Masoero’s Descending over Saint Peter, ca. 1927–37 (possibly 1930–33). It’s an example of futurism’s late embrace of photography. Host Tyler Green and Greene discussed this issue at length on this week’s program.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 2, 2014 2:58pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y18_6Z75
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bremser:

Current events lead us back to one of the most referenced moments in photography history, Roger Fenton’s Crimean War photographs (March 8 to June 26, 1855). The Library of Congress has a good selection, and large tiff files. Get your archive on.
Beyond the one photograph that is among the most famous ever, there are many more worth looking at. A survey reveals the desolate landscapes that Fenton is famous for, but I was surprised to find a majority are military portraits.
Above: Captain Verschoyle, Grenadier Guards, cropped from original tiff, desaturated to reduce sepia.

bremser:

Current events lead us back to one of the most referenced moments in photography history, Roger Fenton’s Crimean War photographs (March 8 to June 26, 1855). The Library of Congress has a good selection, and large tiff files. Get your archive on.

Beyond the one photograph that is among the most famous ever, there are many more worth looking at. A survey reveals the desolate landscapes that Fenton is famous for, but I was surprised to find a majority are military portraits.

Above: Captain Verschoyle, Grenadier Guards, cropped from original tiff, desaturated to reduce sepia.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 1, 2014 10:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y18vk5wS
(View comments