manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jo Ann Callis.

If you know the work of Jeff Wall or Gregory Crewdson or Marilyn Minter, you should know Callis, whose work anticipated theirs. Starting in the early 1970s Callis has constructed both black-and-white and color photographs that consider, sex, sexuality, pleasure and more pleasure.

Aperture has just published “Other Rooms,” a new book of Callis’ investigations of the nude body and sexuality, mostly from the mid-1970s. Amazon offers it for $54. And on Tuesday, June 17th, Callis and Lesley A. Martin will discuss the project at Aperture on West 27th Street in New York. Their conversation starts at 6:30pm.

Callis is one of the most important photographers of her generation. In two thousand nine the J. Paul Getty Museum presented a retrospective of her work titled "Woman Twirling." Callises are in the permanent collection of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

The image at the top of this post is from Callis’ “Animal/Food” series, which Callis and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s program in the context of Matisse’s goldfish paintings. The second image is Matisse’s Goldfish (1912) and the bottom image is Matisse’s Still-Life with Goldfish (1912).

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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June 13, 2014 5:46pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1Id0iLe
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manpodcast:

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is coming to the Hammer Museum! 
Please join host Tyler Green and artist A.L. Steiner for a live-audience taping of The MAN Podcast at the Hammer on June 26. The program starts at 730pm. Tickets are free, and first come, first served. The Hammer box office will open at 630pm. 
A self-described “skeptical queer eco-feminist androgyne,” Steiner uses photography, video, installation, collage, and performance to create work that is irreverent, perverse, personal, and—above all—political.
Steiner’s work is included in “Made in LA 2014,” which opens at the Hammer on June 15. Steiner was also included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Check out Steiner’s website.
Subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

manpodcast:

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is coming to the Hammer Museum! 

Please join host Tyler Green and artist A.L. Steiner for a live-audience taping of The MAN Podcast at the Hammer on June 26. The program starts at 730pm. Tickets are free, and first come, first served. The Hammer box office will open at 630pm. 

A self-described “skeptical queer eco-feminist androgyne,” Steiner uses photography, video, installation, collage, and performance to create work that is irreverent, perverse, personal, and—above all—political.

Steiner’s work is included in “Made in LA 2014,” which opens at the Hammer on June 15. Steiner was also included in the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Check out Steiner’s website.

Subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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June 10, 2014 9:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1IMpvkK
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights Brazilian artist Lygia Clark and the Museum of Modern Art, New York retrospective of her work titled, "Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1949 to 1988." It’s on view through August 24. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA.

The show includes nearly 300 works dating from the late 1940s through the early 1980s, including drawings, paintings, sculptures and Clark’s late participatory works. It looks at Clark’s paintings, her hands-on sculptures and her so-called abandonment of art. 

The show was curated by Connie Butler, who is now the chief curator at the Hammer Museum and Luis Pérez-Oramas, the guest on the first segment of this week’s program. Pérez-Oramas was the curator of the last Sao Paulo International Biennial. His recent MoMA exhibitions have included “Tangled Alphabets: Leon Ferrari and Mira Schendel” and “Transforming Chronologies: An Atlas of Drawings.” 

This is Clark’s Planes in Modulated Surface 4 (1957), from MoMA’s collection.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
June 9, 2014 6:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1IG4VwW
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights Brazilian artist Lygia Clark and the Museum of Modern Art, New York retrospective of her work titled, "Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1949 to 1988." It’s on view through August 24. The exhibition catalogue was published by MoMA.

The show includes nearly 300 works dating from the late 1940s through the early 1980s, including drawings, paintings, sculptures and Clark’s late participatory works. It looks at Clark’s paintings, her hands-on sculptures and her so-called abandonment of art. 

The show was curated by Connie Butler, who is now the chief curator at the Hammer Museum and Luis Pérez-Oramas, the guest on the first segment of this week’s program. Pérez-Oramas was the curator of the last Sao Paulo International Biennial. His recent MoMA exhibitions have included “Tangled Alphabets: Leon Ferrari and Mira Schendel” and “Transforming Chronologies: An Atlas of Drawings.” 

The image above shows many of Clark’s “Bichos” or “Critters” installed at MoMA. Clark intended each sculpture to be handled and altered by viewers.

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
June 6, 2014 9:29pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1H-O-nI
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Carl Andre.

Andre’s work is featured in "Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010," a retrospective organized by the Dia Art Foundation and co-curated by Yasmil Raymond and Philippe Vergne. The show will be on view at Dia’s museum in Beacon, New York through March 2, 2015, after which it will travel to Madrid, Berlin and Paris. A picture of the installation is above.

Andre is one of the most influential artists to emerge from the minimalist movement of the 1960s. The exhibition includes not just Andre’s sculptures, but also many of his poems. Both are featured in the exhibition catalogue, which was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $44.

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
June 3, 2014 6:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1HjJk5s
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Carl Andre.

Andre’s work is featured in "Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010," a retrospective organized by the Dia Art Foundation and co-curated by Yasmil Raymond and Philippe Vergne. The show will be on view at Dia’s museum in Beacon, New York through March 2, 2015, after which it will travel to Madrid, Berlin and Paris. The image above shows part of the Dia installation.

Andre is one of the most influential artists to emerge from the minimalist movement of the 1960s. The exhibition includes not just Andre’s sculptures, but also many of his poems. Both are featured in the exhibition catalogue, which was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $44.

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 30, 2014 6:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1HLYp3V
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Filed under: art 

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Carl Andre.

Andre’s work is featured in "Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958-2010," a retrospective organized by the Dia Art Foundation and co-curated by Yasmil Raymond and Philippe Vergne. The show will be on view at Dia’s museum in Beacon, New York through March 2, 2015, after which it will travel to Madrid, Berlin and Paris.

Andre is one of the most influential artists to emerge from the minimalist movement of the 1960s. The exhibition includes not just Andre’s sculptures, but also many of his poems. Both are featured in the exhibition catalogue, which was published by Yale University Press. Amazon offers it for $44.

Special thanks to Phyllis Tuchman and Jock Reynolds for their assistance with this week’s program.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 29, 2014 1:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1HESkpZ
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Filed under: art 

carletonwatkins:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Stephen Shore. 

Among the topics host Tyler Green and Shore discuss is the 1979 picture of Yosemite’s Merced River with Cathedral Rock in the distance. Green and Shore discussed whether Shore’s picture was motivated by the rich art history of the Yosemite Valley, including work by Carleton Watkins. The two Watkinses here are Cathedral Rock, Down the Valley (1861) and Cathedral Rock, River View (1861), both from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. All three pictures were taken along the Merced River, which cuts through the base of the Yosemite Valley, but Watkins’ pictures were taken closer to Cathedral Rock.

This week Phaidon published Shore’s latest book, "From Galilee to the Negev," which includes pictures Shore has taken of Israel and the West bank from 1994 to 2011. The book also features essays about individual pictures by writers such as Yossi Klein Halevi, Jane Kramer, Steve Sabella and Eyal Weizman. It’s available from Amazon for $67, $33 off the cover price. 

Shore is one of America’s most honored photographers. His books "American Surfaces" and "Uncommon Places" are two of the most influential books in American photography. In 1971 he was the first living photographer to have an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and he was included in the Tate Modern’s first exhibition of photography in 2003. On Wednesday, May 21 you can hear more from Shore when he talks with Met photo curator Jeff Rosenheim at the International Center of Photography.

In addition to the Shore images that are below and that will be on MANPodcast.com all week, you can see more Shores at his website. 

How to listen: Download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 20, 2014 9:50am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1GOLbKU
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Stephen Shore. 

This week Phaidon published Shore’s latest book, "From Galilee to the Negev," which includes pictures Shore has taken of Israel and the West bank from 1994 to 2011. The book also features essays about individual pictures by writers such as Yossi Klein Halevi, Jane Kramer, Steve Sabella and Eyal Weizman. It’s available from Amazon for $67, $33 off the cover price. 

This is a detail of Shore’s 1974 photograph Church Street and Second Street, Easton, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1974. Shore and MAN Podcast host Tyler Green discuss it on this week’s show. 

Shore is one of America’s most honored photographers. His books "American Surfaces" and "Uncommon Places" are two of the most influential books in American photography. In 1971 he was the first living photographer to have an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and he was included in the Tate Modern’s first exhibition of photography in 2003. On Wednesday, May 21 you can hear more from Shore when he talks with Met photo curator Jeff Rosenheim at the International Center of Photography.

In addition to the Shore images that are below and that will be on MANPodcast.com all week, you can see more Shores at his website. 

How to listen: Download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 19, 2014 5:42pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1GKg7oy
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albrightknox:

Anselm Kiefer (German, born 1945). Von der Maas bis an die Memel, von der Etsch bis an den Belt, 2011–12.

German artist Anselm Kiefer’s monumental seascape, Von der Maas bis an die Memel, von der Etsch bis an den Belt, depicts rough waves under a heavy, stormy sky. This work, with its art historical references to nineteenth-century romantic painting and notions of the Sublime, can serve as a metaphor for man’s struggle with his own nature, and also makes reference to the redefinition of personal and national identity.

Kiefer, who was born in Germany during the end of World War II, often explores themes of cultural identity and history in his work while struggling to address and come to terms with the legacy of his country’s actions during this dark period in history. Just as this sea is struggling to withstand the storm and become calm, so did Germany struggle to overcome its actions in World War II and begin again. 

This notion of struggle and rebirth is also made clear in the painting’s title, which references the four bodies of water that formed the German border in 1841. These bodies of water were included in the first stanza of Germany’s national anthem, “Deutschland Über Alles,” which, by declaring that Germany is above everything in the world, became too controversial and is now excluded when the anthem is sung. Through the painting’s title, Kiefer makes a strong statement about the German psyche’s relationship to the land and sea and its struggle to come to terms with its past. 

Images: Anselm Kiefer (German, born 1945). Von der Maas bis an die Memel, von der Etsch bis an den Belt (From the Maas to the Memel, from the Etsch to the Belt), 2011–12. Acrylic, emulsion, oil, shellac, and electrolysis on canvas in artist’s lead frame, 176 3/8 x 248 x 17 11/16 inches (448 x 630 x 45 cm). Collection of Larry Gagosian. Installation photographs by Tom Loonan.

This work is on view as part of the exhibition Anselm Kiefer: Beyond Landscape through October 5, 2014.

Posted by modernartnotes
May 19, 2014 1:13pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1GJKJEa
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Stephen Shore. 

This week Phaidon published Shore’s latest book, "From Galilee to the Negev," which includes pictures Shore has taken of Israel and the West bank from 1994 to 2011. The book also features essays about individual pictures by writers such as Yossi Klein Halevi, Jane Kramer, Steve Sabella and Eyal Weizman. It’s available from Amazon for $67, $33 off the cover price. 

Shore is one of America’s most honored photographers. His books "American Surfaces" and "Uncommon Places" are two of the most influential books in American photography. In 1971 he was the first living photographer to have an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and he was included in the Tate Modern’s first exhibition of photography in 2003. On Wednesday, May 21 you can hear more from Shore when he talks with Met photo curator Jeff Rosenheim at the International Center of Photography.

In addition to the Shore images that are below and that will be on MANPodcast.com all week, you can see more Shores at his website. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 15, 2014 2:01pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1Fy7k0Z
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Filed under: art books stephen shore 

manpodcast:

This is one Carleton Watkins picture printed four different times. It’s The Domes from the Sentinel Dome, Yosemite (1865-66). Different prints of the picture are in about a dozen different collections around the world. 

We’re showing you four versions of the picture to demonstrate how print quality and condition vary from artwork to artwork. The picture at the top of this post is the print in the Stanford University Libraries and is on view in  "Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums" at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University.

Next is a print from the Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, then the J. Paul Getty Museum, and finally the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Count the Stanford print as a good example of how the exhibition now at the Cantor features prints of extraordinary quality. Click on each picture to expand it!

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums" at the Cantor. The exhibition, which is on view through August 17, features 83 mammoth plates from three unique Watkins albums in the special collections of the Stanford University Libraries. It was curated by Cantor curator Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell and George Philip LeBourdais.

On the occasion of the exhibition, Stanford University Press has published “Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums,” an exhibition catalogue that features essays from three of the guests on this week’s program: Alexander Nemerov, Erik Steiner and Corey Keller. The book features what may be the largest reproductions of Watkins mammoth-plate pictures ever published. At $35, it’s a bargain. (Expect the price to go up when the book goes into a second printing.) 

Alexander Nemerov is a professor of the arts and humanities at Stanford. His most recent books are “To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America,” the catalogue to the exhibition of the same title he curated at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, “Acting in the Night: Macbeth and the Places of the Civil War.” His most recent book is “Wartime Kiss: Visions of the Moment in the 1940s,” a look at the power of American photographs and films from the 1940s. 

Erik Steiner is the creative director of the Spatial History Project, a part of the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis at Stanford. His recent projects include "Shaping the West," which examined how the railroad impacted the construction of space in the 19th-century West.

Corey Keller is a curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and one of America’s top experts on 19th-century photography. Keller’s exhibitions include “Brought to Light: Photography and the Invisible, 1840-1900,” which explored the use of photography in 19th-century science. Her other exhibitions include surveys of Henry Wessel and Francesca Woodman. 

How to listen: Download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 14, 2014 2:45pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1FsXpXj
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums" at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. The exhibition, which is on view through August 17, features 83 mammoth plates from three unique Watkins albums in the special collections of the Stanford University Library. It was curated by Cantor curator Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell and George Philip LeBourdais.

On the occasion of the exhibition, Stanford University Press has published “Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums,” an exhibition catalogue that features essays from three of the guests on this week’s program: Alexander Nemerov, Erik Steiner and Corey Keller. The book features what may be the largest reproductions of Watkins mammoth-plate pictures ever published. At $35, it’s a bargain. (Expect the price to go up when the book goes into a second printing.) 

Alexander Nemerov is a professor of the arts and humanities at Stanford. His most recent books are “To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America,” the catalogue to the exhibition of the same title he curated at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, “Acting in the Night: Macbeth and the Places of the Civil War.” His most recent book is “Wartime Kiss: Visions of the Moment in the 1940s,” a look at the power of American photographs and films from the 1940s. 

Erik Steiner is the creative director of the Spatial History Project, a part of the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis at Stanford. His recent projects include "Shaping the West," which examined how the railroad impacted the construction of space in the 19th-century West.

Corey Keller is a curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and one of America’s top experts on 19th-century photography. Keller’s exhibitions include “Brought to Light: Photography and the Invisible, 1840-1900,” which explored the use of photography in 19th-century science. Her other exhibitions include surveys of Henry Wessel and Francesca Woodman. 

On the second segment, Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Ilona Katzew joins the program to discuss Spanish colonial art. On May 16-17 she’ll be presenting at a symposium at New York’s Frick Collection titled, "The Americas Revealed: Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States." Katzew is widely considered a leading expert on the subject. Her new galleries at LACMA are a highlight of the institution’s permanent collection spaces. 

In 2011-12 she organized "Contested Visions is the Spanish Colonial World." For a limited time, the must-own catalogue of that exhibition is available from LACMA for just $10. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 8, 2014 2:11pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1FIaml6
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights James McNeill Whistler.

On the first segment, Daniel E. Sutherland discusses his new biography of the artist, "Whistler: A Life For Art’s Sake." It is the first biography of Whistler published in twenty years, and the first to make use of Whistler’s private correspondence. “Whistler” was published by Yale University Press. The image above is of the book’s cover. Amazon offers the book for as little as $20.

Sutherland is a history professor at the University of Arkansas. His previous subjects have included the Civil War and life in post-Civil War America. 

Among the topics Sutherland and host Tyler Green discuss is Whistler’s famed libel suit against John Ruskin, a trial that significantly impacted Whistler’s life. The suit was prompted by Ruskin’s reaction to the painting at the top of this post, Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket (1875), now at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Whistler wasn’t the only 19thC artist fascinated by fireworks: Also pictured here is James Ensor’s Fireworks (1887) at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, and Winslow Homer’s Sailboat and Fourth of July Fireworks (1880) at the Harvard Art Museums.

On the second segment, Margaret F. MacDonald discusses the exhibition "An American in London: Whistler and the Thames." The show is on view at the Smithsonian’s Sackler Gallery from Saturday through August 17. MacDonald co-curated “An American in London” with Patricia de Montfort. It originated at London’s Dulwich Picture Gallery. The catalogue was published by Philip Wilson Publishers.

MacDonald is a professor of art history at the University of Glasgow and the director of “James McNeill Whistler: The Etchings. A Catalogue Raisonne.” The digital catalogue raisonne is available here.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast: On SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 5, 2014 1:11pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1F0j4oA
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights James McNeill Whistler. 

On the first segment, Daniel E. Sutherland discusses his new biography of the artist, "Whistler: A Life For Art’s Sake." It is the first biography of Whistler published in twenty years, and the first to make use of Whistler’s private correspondence. “Whistler” was published by Yale University Press.

Sutherland is a history professor at the University of Arkansas. His previous subjects have included the Civil War and life in post-Civil War America. 

Among the topics Sutherland and host Tyler Green discuss are:

  • Whistler’s collecting and how what he collected contributed to his work;
  • The relationship between Whistler and Courbet; and
  • His passion for — and his position on — etching.

On the second segment, Margaret F. MacDonald discusses the exhibition "An American in London: Whistler and the Thames." The show is on view at the Smithsonian’s Sackler Gallery from Saturday through August 17. MacDonald co-curated “An American in London” with Patricia de Montfort. It originated at London’s Dulwich Picture Gallery. The catalogue was published by Philip Wilson Publishers.

MacDonald is a professor of art history at the University of Glasgow and the director of “James McNeill Whistler: The Etchings. A Catalogue Raisonne.” The digital catalogue raisonne is available here.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
May 1, 2014 1:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1EewHZx
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