manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963-2010" at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews now, opens to the public on April 19 and will remain on view through August 3. The exhibition’s catalogue was published by MoMA.

Joining the program to discuss the exhibition is Kathy Halbreich, who curated “Alibis.” Halbreich is MoMA’s associate director and the former director of the Walker Art Center. Her last exhibition before “Alibis” was a 2010 installation of contemporary art from MoMA’s collection that was co-curated with Christophe Cherix.

On the second segment, Olaf Peters discusses "Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937," which is on view through June 30. Peters is a professor at the Peters is a professor at the Institute for Art History and Archaeology in Europe at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg. He curated “Degenerate Art” and edited its excellent exhibition catalogue, which was published by Prestel.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license.

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
April 17, 2014 3:45pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1DKO8qq
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Hans Op de Beeck.

Op de Beeck’s Staging Silence (2) (2013, detail of a still is the image above) just concluded a run at MIT’s List Visual Art Center and opens next at MOCA Cleveland in June. Also in June, the Sammlung Goetz in Munich opens “Hans Op de Beeck,” an overview of Op de Beeck’s work from the last 15 years. Op de Beeck’s work is on view through July 6 at The Baker Museum in Naples, Fla. in "Museum to Scale 1:7."

Op de Beeck has been the subject of dozens of solo shows in the United States, Europe and Asia, including at the Kunstverein Hannover, the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Brussels’ ARGOS, the Palais de Tokyo in Paris and dozens more.

See Op de Beeck’s work: All of Op de Beeck’s film installations, including Staging Silence (2), are on his website. Eight of them are available at 1080p on his YouTube channel. Op de Beeck’s Sea of Tranquility (2009) is on MOCAtv.

On the second segment, Kimbell Art Museum director Eric Lee discusses the Kimbell’s recent acquisition of Jacob van Ruisdael’s Edge of a Forest with a Grainfield, which will go on view at the museum later this month. The painting is considered one of the finest Dutch landscapes in the world.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
April 10, 2014 2:44pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1Cg3L9p
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes examines the new Aperture magazine (#214), which explores the growth and evolution of documentary photography.

The guests on this week’s program are:

Hito Steyerl, featured in Aperture #214 e-mailing with Bard professor Thomas Keenan about the role photographs play as a document of something that happened (or may have happened). Steyerl is a Berlin-based artist and filmmaker whose work often examines the mass proliferation of digital images. The Institute of Contemporary Arts London is showing her work in the exhibition “Hito Steyerl,” which runs through April 27. (In association with the exhibition, Steyerl has created a two-part edition for free download. Check it out.)

The image above runs with Steyerl’s conversation with Thomas Keenan. It shows Military police throwing gas bombs at protesters at Sé Church, in São Paulo, Brazil, on June 11, 2013. It was taken by Midia Ninja. Steyerl and MAN Podcast host Tyler Green discuss how images such as this function as a document of a moment — or if they don’t.

Emily Schiffer, whose "See Potential" project is featured in Aperture #214. She has received grants from the Open Society Foundation and the Magnum Foundation. "See Potential" was a project that used documentary photography to address the neglect of Chicago’s traditionally black neighborhoods. Working with Orrin Williams, the founder of the Center for Urban Transformation, Schiffer designed a project that identified community goals and that solicited community feedback on potential changes in those communities. During the program Schiffer mentions the work of Tonika Johnson and Carlos Javier Ortiz.

The image above is a detail of a 2006 picture taken by Dave Jordano, one of the “See Potential” photographers. It’s of Pastor John Anderson, of the New Faith in Christ Revival Center in Chicago and is part of Jordano’s investigation of small South Side churches. See more of his work at the “See Potential” website and at DaveJordano.com.

Teru Kuwayama, who discusses his 2010-11 project “Basetrack” in Aperture #214. Kuwayama has received fellowships from the Hoover Institution, TED, the Dart Center at Columbia University and at Stanford. ”Basetrack” embedded five photographers embed within a Marine battalion in Afghanistan that was focused on counterinsurgency. The project documented the battalion’s work through photography and a specific, targeted use of social media platforms such as Flickr and Facebook. While the project is no longer on line in its original form, it is residually available at FacebookFlickrVimeo and especially at Kuwayama’s Instagram page. See the project "30 Mosques."

Talia Herman, a California-based journalist and photographer. Herman is a graduate of the International Center of Photography’s Documentary and Photojournalism Program and has worked on projects for The Wall Street Journal, Wired, Google and Men’s Journal. Last week Al Jazeera America featured Herman’s work in "Getting By," part of the organization’s ongoing examination of poverty in America. As part of “Getting By,” AJAM asked people living below the federal poverty line to share their stories. Russ Bowers of Guerneville, Calif., wrote in, and AJAM selected his story to tell through his own words and through Herman’s pictures. Herman and host Tyler Green also discussed this image of the California drought. 

Aperture #214: Check out the table of contents for Aperture #214, and purchase a copy for under $20. Subscribe to a full year of the magazine for $75.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
April 7, 2014 8:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1CQ4PYG
(View comments  

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes examines the new Aperture magazine (#214), which explores the growth and evolution of documentary photography.

The guests on this week’s program are:

Hito Steyerl, featured in Aperture #214 e-mailing with Bard professor Thomas Keenan about the role photographs play as a document of something that happened (or may have happened). Steyerl is a Berlin-based artist and filmmaker whose work often examines the mass proliferation of digital images. The Institute of Contemporary Arts London is showing her work in the exhibition “Hito Steyerl,” which runs through April 27. (In association with the exhibition, Steyerl has created a two-part edition for free download. Check it out.)

Emily Schiffer, whose "See Potential" project is featured in Aperture #214. She has received grants from the Open Society Foundation and the Magnum Foundation. "See Potential" was a project that used documentary photography to address the neglect of Chicago’s traditionally black neighborhoods. Working with Orrin Williams, the founder of the Center for Urban Transformation, Schiffer designed a project that identified community goals and that solicited community feedback on potential changes in those communities. During the program Schiffer mentions the work of Tonika Johnson and Carlos Javier Ortiz.

The image above is a detail of a 2006 picture taken by Dave Jordano, one of the “See Potential” photographers. It’s of Pastor John Anderson, of the New Faith in Christ Revival Center in Chicago and is part of Jordano’s investigation of small South Side churches. See more of his work at the “See Potential” website and at DaveJordano.com.

Teru Kuwayama, who discusses his 2010-11 project “Basetrack” in Aperture #214. Kuwayama has received fellowships from the Hoover Institution, TED, the Dart Center at Columbia University and at Stanford. ”Basetrack” embedded five photographers embed within a Marine battalion in Afghanistan that was focused on counterinsurgency. The project documented the battalion’s work through photography and a specific, targeted use of social media platforms such as Flickr and Facebook. While the project is no longer on line in its original form, it is residually available at FacebookFlickrVimeo and especially at Kuwayama’s Instagram page. See the project "30 Mosques."

Talia Herman, a California-based journalist and photographer. Herman is a graduate of the International Center of Photography’s Documentary and Photojournalism Program and has worked on projects for The Wall Street Journal, Wired, Google and Men’s Journal. Last week Al Jazeera America featured Herman’s work in "Getting By," part of the organization’s ongoing examination of poverty in America. As part of “Getting By,” AJAM asked people living below the federal poverty line to share their stories. Russ Bowers of Guerneville, Calif., wrote in, and AJAM selected his story to tell through his own words and through Herman’s pictures. Herman and host Tyler Green also discussed this image of the California drought. 

Aperture #214: Check out the table of contents for Aperture #214, and purchase a copy for under $20. Subscribe to a full year of the magazine for $75.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
April 6, 2014 6:10pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1CJHqg2
(View comments  

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes examines the new Aperture magazine (#214), which explores the growth and evolution of documentary photography.

The guests on this week’s program are:

Hito Steyerl, featured in Aperture #214 e-mailing with Bard professor Thomas Keenan about the role photographs play as a document of something that happened (or may have happened). Steyerl is a Berlin-based artist and filmmaker whose work often examines the mass proliferation of digital images. The Institute of Contemporary Arts London is showing her work in the exhibition “Hito Steyerl,” which runs through April 27. (In association with the exhibition, Steyerl has created a two-part edition for free download. Check it out.)

Emily Schiffer, whose "See Potential" project is featured in Aperture #214. She has received grants from the Open Society Foundation and the Magnum Foundation. "See Potential" was a project that used documentary photography to address the neglect of Chicago’s traditionally black neighborhoods. Working with Orrin Williams, the founder of the Center for Urban Transformation, Schiffer designed a project that identified community goals and that solicited community feedback on potential changes in those communities. During the program Schiffer mentions the work of Tonika Johnson and Carlos Javier Ortiz.

Teru Kuwayama, who discusses his 2010-11 project “Basetrack” in Aperture #214. Kuwayama has received fellowships from the Hoover Institution, TED, the Dart Center at Columbia University and at Stanford. ”Basetrack” embedded five photographers embed within a Marine battalion in Afghanistan that was focused on counterinsurgency. The project documented the battalion’s work through photography and a specific, targeted use of social media platforms such as Flickr and Facebook. While the project is no longer on line in its original form, it is residually available at FacebookFlickrVimeo and especially at Kuwayama’s Instagram page. See the project "30 Mosques."

Talia Herman, a California-based journalist and photographer. Herman is a graduate of the International Center of Photography’s Documentary and Photojournalism Program and has worked on projects for The Wall Street Journal, Wired, Google and Men’s Journal. Last week Al Jazeera America featured Herman’s work in "Getting By," part of the organization’s ongoing examination of poverty in America. As part of “Getting By,” AJAM asked people living below the federal poverty line to share their stories. Russ Bowers of Guerneville, Calif., wrote in, and AJAM selected his story to tell through his own words and through Herman’s pictures. Herman and host Tyler Green also discussed this image of the California drought. 

Aperture #214: Check out the table of contents for Aperture #214, and purchase a copy for under $20. Subscribe to a full year of the magazine for $75.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Posted by modernartnotes
April 3, 2014 2:25pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1B-sxSe
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Filed under: documentary photography 

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Barkley L. Hendricks.

Hendricks is included in the Brooklyn Museum exhibition "Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties," which examines how 66 artists addressed the civil rights struggle in their work. Curated by Teresa Carbone and Kellie Jones, the show is on view through July 6. The exhibition’s handsome catalogue is available from Amazon for under $30.

This is Hendricks’ 1972 Sir Charles, aka Willie Harris, which Hendricks and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s program. It’s in the collection of the National Gallery of Art and will be included in the forthcoming exhibition "Face Value: Portraiture in the Age of Abstraction" at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery.

In 2008 Hendricks was the subject of a major retrospective organized by Trevor Schoonmaker for the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. The exhibition traveled to Houston, Philadelphia, New York and Santa Monica.  His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Tate, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Harvard Art Museums.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 31, 2014 9:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BmXngj
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manpodcast:

Phyllida Barlow, most recently seen in the United States in the just-closed Carnegie International, has fulfilled a major commission for the Tate. The exhibition goes on view today and will be up through October 19. The image above is a detail from the installation, which is titled dock (2014).

Barlow was the guest for the full hour of Episode No. 109 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast. All of us here at The MAN Podcast think it’s one of our very best shows. 

Listen to or download Phyllida Barlow on The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 31, 2014 2:55pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BkTxwD
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taliaherman:

From a shoot I did for Al Jazeera of Russ Bowers at his home in Faerie Ring Campground, Guerneville, California, March 8th, 2014.
For more: 
http://projects.aljazeera.com/2014/poverty-gettingby/index.html

taliaherman:

From a shoot I did for Al Jazeera of Russ Bowers at his home in Faerie Ring Campground, Guerneville, California, March 8th, 2014.

For more: 

http://projects.aljazeera.com/2014/poverty-gettingby/index.html

Posted by modernartnotes
March 28, 2014 1:40pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BRIbLZ
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Barkley L. Hendricks.
Hendricks is included in the Brooklyn Museum exhibition "Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties," which examines how 66 artists addressed the civil rights struggle in their work. Curated by Teresa Carbone and Kellie Jones, the show is on view through July 6. The exhibition’s handsome catalogue is available from Amazon for under $30.
This is Hendricks’ 1974 Family Jules: NNN (No Naked Niggahs), which is in the collection of the Tate. On this week’s MAN Podcast Hendricks and host Tyler Green discuss this piece, Hendricks’ use of George Jules Taylor as a model, and Hendricks’ interest in male nude portraiture.
In 2008 Hendricks was the subject of a major retrospective organized by Trevor Schoonmaker for the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. The exhibition traveled to Houston, Philadelphia, New York and Santa Monica.  His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Tate, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Harvard Art Museums.
Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Barkley L. Hendricks.

Hendricks is included in the Brooklyn Museum exhibition "Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties," which examines how 66 artists addressed the civil rights struggle in their work. Curated by Teresa Carbone and Kellie Jones, the show is on view through July 6. The exhibition’s handsome catalogue is available from Amazon for under $30.

This is Hendricks’ 1974 Family Jules: NNN (No Naked Niggahs)which is in the collection of the Tate. On this week’s MAN Podcast Hendricks and host Tyler Green discuss this piece, Hendricks’ use of George Jules Taylor as a model, and Hendricks’ interest in male nude portraiture.

In 2008 Hendricks was the subject of a major retrospective organized by Trevor Schoonmaker for the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. The exhibition traveled to Houston, Philadelphia, New York and Santa Monica.  His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Tate, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Harvard Art Museums.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 28, 2014 1:31pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BRG7AB
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manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Saint Louis Art Museum curator Simon Kelly talking about "Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet," which is on view at SLAM through July 6. Kelly co-curated the exhibition with Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator April M. Watson.
Despite the show’s title, this isn’t really an exhibition of impressionist painting. Instead it looks at how artists — both painters and photographers — engaged with and helped shape France’s emerging national identity between 1850-80, a period during which France cycled through several governments and lost the Franco-Prussian War (and along with it Alsace and Lorraine) to Germany. The exhibition’s catalogue, available from Amazon for under $30, is one of the smartest catalogues of 19th-century French history and art history a number of years. 
This painting is Gustave Dore’s Deer in a Pine Forest (Vosges) (1865). It’s from the collection of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and it’s in Kelly’s show. On this week’s program, Kelly tells us how new research reveals what this painting tells us about pre-Franco-Prussian War France.  
Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

manpodcast:

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Saint Louis Art Museum curator Simon Kelly talking about "Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet," which is on view at SLAM through July 6. Kelly co-curated the exhibition with Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator April M. Watson.

Despite the show’s title, this isn’t really an exhibition of impressionist painting. Instead it looks at how artists — both painters and photographers — engaged with and helped shape France’s emerging national identity between 1850-80, a period during which France cycled through several governments and lost the Franco-Prussian War (and along with it Alsace and Lorraine) to Germany. The exhibition’s catalogue, available from Amazon for under $30, is one of the smartest catalogues of 19th-century French history and art history a number of years. 

This painting is Gustave Dore’s Deer in a Pine Forest (Vosges) (1865). It’s from the collection of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh and it’s in Kelly’s show. On this week’s program, Kelly tells us how new research reveals what this painting tells us about pre-Franco-Prussian War France.  

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 28, 2014 11:25am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BQko-r
(View comments  
Filed under: art 

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Barkley L. Hendricks.

Hendricks is included in the Brooklyn Museum exhibition “Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties,” which examines how 66 artists addressed the civil rights struggle in their work. Curated by Teresa Carbone and Kellie Jones, the show is on view through July 6. The exhibition’s handsome catalogue is available from Amazon for under $30.

In 2008 Hendricks was the subject of a major retrospective organized by Trevor Schoonmaker for the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. The exhibition traveled to Houston, Philadelphia, New York and Santa Monica.  His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Tate, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Harvard Art Museums.

On the second segment, Saint Louis Art Museum curator Simon Kelly talks about "Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet," which is on view at SLAM through July 6. Kelly co-curated the exhibition with Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art curator April M. Watson.

Despite the show’s title, this isn’t really an exhibition of impressionist painting. Instead it looks at how artists — both painters and photographers — engaged with and helped shape France’s emerging national identity between 1850-80, a period during which France cycled through several governments and lost the Franco-Prussian War (and along with it Alsace and Lorraine) to Germany. The exhibition’s catalogue, available from Amazon for under $30, is one of the smartest catalogues of 19th-century French history and art history a number of years. 

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 27, 2014 2:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1BLnEmL
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Filed under: art 

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Carla Klein and Nayland Blake.

An exhibition of Klein’s new work opens today at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery in New York. Klein’s work is big and painterly. She paints landscapes that are rooted in abstraction. She has had a dozen solo gallery exhibitions in Europe and in the United States, and in two thousand five the Berkeley Art Museum featured her in one of its Matrix shows. Klein paintings are in the collections of the Berkeley Art Museum and the Miami Art Museum.

The image above is a detail from an untitled painting in Klein’s ongoing exhibition. It’s about seven feet tall and ten feet wide. Klein and MAN Podcast host Tyler Green discuss this painting on this week’s program.

On the second segment, Blake talks about his work in “Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology” at the Hammer Museum. The exhibition, which was curated by Anne Ellegood and Johanna Burton, is on view through May 18. Blake has long made work about queer identity, and he’s organized shows about it too, such as the landmark 1995 exhibition “In a Different Light” that he co-curated with Lawrence Rinder for the Berkeley Art Museum. Blake has been the subject of many solo exhibitions, most recently Free! Love! Tool! Box! last year at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco.  He’s also the chairman of the International Center of Photography -Bard MFA program.

Listen to or download The MAN Podcast on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 24, 2014 4:41pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1B4SF64
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manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

Early in his career Heinecken made a number of ‘photograph-sculptures’ in which he presented human forms on an armature that insisted upon viewer interaction. This is Figure in Six Selections (1965), which asks a viewer to arrange a woman’s body as a painter or photographer might ask a model to arrange herself. 

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

This is an untitled, undated off-set lithograph Heinecken made. It features a typical example of Heinecken using one of his ‘favorite’ news images — a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads — and presenting it in a single image with the sort of news magazine advertisement that would have ‘accompanied’ the photograph. This piece is in the collection of the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, Ariz.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 14, 2014 5:06pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1A7dzzl
(View comments  
Filed under: art 
manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.
Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.
Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.
This is Heinecken’s Multiple Solution Puzzle (1965), which is in the MoMA retrospective (and which is discussed on this week’s program). It’s an example of how Heinecken loved to embrace — and encourage — chance in his work. Heinecken encouraged viewers to handle and arrange the work.
On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?
Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”
Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
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via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

This is Heinecken’s Multiple Solution Puzzle (1965), which is in the MoMA retrospective (and which is discussed on this week’s program). It’s an example of how Heinecken loved to embrace — and encourage — chance in his work. Heinecken encouraged viewers to handle and arrange the work.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Posted by modernartnotes
March 13, 2014 9:34pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZK7Y6y1A3MwBq
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